HR duty is to ensure UK competitiveness

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. HR duty is to ensure UK competitivenessOn 18 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today So, the controlled chaos of congestion charging has started. While theteething troubles will be felt in central London, the solutions have beenworked out on a dusty IT park in India. IT outsourcing company Mastek is responsible for designing the software thatallows for the monitoring of traffic. It is another small example of themounting trend of outsourcing technology services and call centre provision tothe sub-continent. Research suggests that a fifth of the UK’s call centre jobswill be transferred to India by 2010, to take advantage of cost savings. While employers are rightly blaming the Government for increasing employmentcosts and reducing flexibility in the UK, they also need to examine their ownroles. The IT and service sectors have become important to the UK. If we starthaemorrhaging jobs abroad, then this has significant implications for thelong-term health of our economy. The easy route – naturally favoured by finance directors – is to seek thelowest cost provider, but HR has a duty to ensure staff in the UK are ascompetitive as they can possibly be. Instead of threatening staff with the spectre of outsourcing as a means ofgetting compliance (see page 1), HR should be developing the type of motivatedand skilled workforce that don’t need to worry about it. One-stop advice for you This week, Personnel Today celebrates its 15th birthday – a fitting momentperhaps to announce a fresh and important initiative for the profession. We arelaunching a new brand – Personnel Today’s Management Resources – to deliver aregular flow of high quality, practical information on subscription only. Beginning with the publication of one stop guides on key themes, PersonnelToday is committed to providing products which cut through the jargon, savetime and money and give you step-by-step advice on implementing change in yourbusiness. In keeping with the magazine and Personneltoday.com, these guides will betopical, reliable and accessible to all. Online Recruitment is the subject ofour first guide and is published this week. last_img read more

Renovated character home offers masterful dual living

first_imgThe home has been renovated from top to bottom.The two-storey house now has a living, dining and kitchen area on the ground floor, along with a powder room and a laundry with plumbing for two washing machines. There is also a master bedroom with walk-in robe and ensuite and a second bedroom with built-in robe on the ground level. Upstairs there is a second open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, a family bathroom, three bedrooms with built-in robes and a home office. More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019Outside there is a wraparound veranda upstairs and a covered patio area downstairs. The wraparound veranda gets lovely breezes“There is so much space on the veranda and the afternoon breezes through Kalinga are sensational,” Mr Hunt Cosgrove said. The home has luxury fittings and new pluming, gas and electrical connections throughout. “Most of my building experience is in luxury homes so I’ve included a lot of the features I normally work with such as the sunken bath and LED lighting,” Mr Hunt Cosgrove said. “We also made sure to retain the rustic charm of the Queenslander, which is what I believe inner-city Brisbane needs to preserve.”Mr Hunt Cosgrove said the home would suit an extended family with older children or grandparents living at home.The home is being marketed by Jason Gegg from LJ Hooker Clayfield. The home will be auctioned on April 22 at 10.30am. THIS charming Queenslander has been totally renovated and set up for dual living.Owner-builder Adam Hunt Cosgrove of I Q Construction bought the home at 55 Dawson St, Kalinga with his wife, Michelle, in June 2015. “It was in need of some love and care when we bought it, but it had good bones,” Mr Hunt Cosgrove said. “I gave it a complete makeover but stayed within the footprint of the house.” last_img read more

People moves: More departures from DWS as new COO appointed [updated]

first_imgKlaas KnotFinancial Stability Board – Klass Knot , president of Dutch regulator De Nederlandsche Bank , has been appointed vice-chair of the Financial Stability Board for a three-year term, and will chair the FSB from December 2021.The FSB’s new chair from next month is Randal Quarles , governor of the US Federal Reserve . Quarles replaces Bank of England governor Mark Carney, who chaired the board for seven years.Carney said: “Randy and Klaas will provide strong leadership and continuity as the FSB pivots towards the implementation and evaluation of post-crisis reforms, and to addressing emerging vulnerabilities in the global financial system. Their appointment demonstrates the FSB’s unique role as a member-led, international body for cooperation on global financial stability.”The FSB consists of senior regulators, central bank governors and government officials from 24 countries as well as representatives of 10 international bodies, the ECB and the European Commission.Dimensional – The $596bn (€466.4bn) asset manager has made a series of changes to its leadership team, including the appointment of Michael Holmes as chief technology officer. He joins from Bridgewater Associates and has worked in financial services technology for 25 years.Elsewhere, Carlo Venes has been appointed head of global institutional services, effective 1 January. He is currently head of institutional for Asia excluding Japan, and has worked at Dimensional since 2011.John Romiza is to relinquish his role as co-head of global equity trading in the new year to focus on his responsibilities as co-CEO of Dimensional Fund Advisors, with Ryan Wiley becoming sole head of global equity trading. Jason Lapping is to transition from head of Asia Pacific trading to head of international equity trading.The company has also hired Al Sears from BAM Advisor Services as vice president, focusing on technology, and Darcy Keller from the Financial Times as head of corporate communications.“Our clients know we take a long-term view in how we think about markets. We also make long-term investments in our people. Investors in the future will have different needs than today, and we’re strengthening our leadership team so we are well positioned for our clients in the decades to come,” said Gerard O’Reilly, Dimensional co-CEO and CIO.Lyxor Asset Management – The €140.8bn asset manager has named David Lake as chief executive officer for its UK business. He replaces Matthieu Mouly who has moved to France to continue as global head of sales for Lyxor’s exchange-traded fund (ETF) arm.Lake is currently Lyxor’s head of ETF sales for UK and Ireland, a role he will keep alongside his chief executive duties. He joined in June 2017 from Source ETF, where he also led the sales team for the UK and Ireland.Lionel Paquin, CEO of Lyxor Asset Management, said that the UK was “a key market” for the company and it would continue to grow its operations in the country.AXA Investment Managers – AXA IM has named Robert Price as a portfolio manager in its “buy and maintain” fixed income team. He transfers from the company’s liability-driven investment (LDI) team, but will continue to work with European LDI clients. He will also focus on AXA IM’s “cashflow delivery investing” strategies, which have just reached £3bn (€3.4bn) in assets under management.Lionel Pernias, head of the buy and maintain team, said: “As pension schemes become more focused on cashflow delivery, we continue to see growth and demand from providers on buy and maintain credit strategies.”Hewlett-Packard – The €1.9bn Dutch pension fund for computer hardware company Hewlett-Packard has appointed Rita van Ewijk and Otto van’t Hof as trustees on its eight-strong board, representing the employer and workers, respectively. Van Ewijk is an external board member. She also chairs the €170m Pensioenfonds Cindu International.Pensioenfonds Sabic – Pascal Wolters has been appointed as the new independent chairman of the €2.5bn Dutch pension fund Sabic as of 1 January 2019. He is to succeed Jo Mastenbroek , who has been at the helm for two years.Wolters has previously worked for 16 years in asset management, pensions and support at the €409bn civil service scheme ABP and its asset manager and pensions provider APG. Prior to this, he was on the board of the €209bn healthcare scheme PFZW. Since May, he has been an expert board member at SPOV, the €3.9bn Dutch pension fund for public transport.Pensioenfonds Detailhandel – Selma Gouderjaan is to start as trustee for employees at the €20.7bn pension fund for the retail sector (Detailhandel) as of 1 January. She has been trustee for trade at the trade union FNV since 2015, representing union members at chemists and the retailer Ahold.KPMG – KPMG has hired a trio of advisers from Mercer to open an office in Bristol, in the south west of England. George Fowler joins as a partner to focus on larger pension schemes; Paula Champion is a director focusing on mid-sized schemes in the south of England, while also supporting KPMG’s Birmingham-based pensions business; and Matt Flower joins as a senior manager with responsibility for business development.LifeSight – Willis Towers Watson’s UK defined contribution master trust has appointed Caroline Fawcett as a trustee. She replaces Gill Barr, who has stepped down at the end of her term. Fawcett spent 11 years in various roles at Legal & General, and is now a non-executive director at the Money Advice Service alongside a number of other non-exec roles.AZL – Annemieke Visser has succeeded Arthur van der Wal as member of the supervisory board at pensions provider AZL, part of NN Group. Visser – a former director of Delta Lloyd, which was taken over by NN last year – is also director of pension services at Nationale-Nederlanden Life Insurance .AZL’s supervisory board also comprises Michel van Elk, Henriëtte Prast and Willem Stevens. Van der Wal left the board following his appointment as chief executive at Syntrus Achmea Real Estate & Finance on 1 September.ShareAction – Fergus Moffatt has become the responsible investment campaign group’s head of UK policy, joining from the UK Sustainable Investment and Finance Association. Moffatt replaces Bethan Livesey , who moves to a part-time role as senior fellow. DWS, FSB, Dimensional, Lyxor, AXA IM, Hewlett-Packard, Sabic, Detailhandel, KPMG, Lifesight, AZL, ShareActionDWS Group – The €692bn asset manager has named a new chief operating officer and head of coverage for Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), with the incumbent staff set to leave this week.Jon Eilbeck , currently COO, is to exit after 19 years at Deutsche Bank’s asset management businesses. He will be replaced by Mark Cullen , currently head of group audit at Deutsche Bank.Thorsten Michalik , head of EMEA coverage, is also set to leave after an 18-year career at Deutsche Bank. Dirk Goergen , head of sales for private clients in Germany at Deutsche’s private and commercial bank, will take up the role as well as leading on DWS’ digital distribution strategy. Both Cullen and Goergen will join DWS’ executive board.  Asoka Woehrmann, who replaced Nicolas Moreau as CEO of DWS Group last month, said Cullen and Goergen were “outstanding individuals” with “a diverse set of qualities” to bring to their roles.He added: “I would like to thank Jon Eilbeck and Thorsten Michalik for their exceptional contributions to both DWS and Deutsche Bank over many years of service and wish them well for the future. With these changes to our executive board, we have the right leadership team in place to focus all our efforts on doing our best for our clients, our investors and our colleagues in DWS.”A spokeswoman for DWS said there were no further board-level changes planned.last_img read more

Italy Misses World Cup for the First Time Since 1958

first_img  Buffon retires as Sweden qualifies for Russia 2018 ahead of the AzzurriFour-time champions Italy failed to reach the World Cup for the first time since 1958 after a play-off defeat against Sweden.It means the Azzurri will not be present in the competition for only the second time in their history having declined to play at the inaugural tournament in 1930.Midfielder Jakob Johansson’s deflected strike in the first leg was the difference as the second leg at Milan’s San Siro stadium last night ended goalless. Sweden sat back on their advantage and, despite the hosts enjoying 75 per cent possession, they failed to find the breakthrough – Italy’s best chance saw goalkeeper Robin Olsen palm away substitute Stephan El Shaarawy’s thumping late volley.Striker Ciro Immobile missed a number of chances and his low effort in the first half was cleared off the line by centre-back Andreas Granqvist.The result sees Jan Andersson’s Sweden side reach the World Cup for the first time since 2006, when they were in the same group as England.While Italy dominated the second leg and had 20 shots at goal, their exertions radiated a growing sense of desperation.Gian Piero Ventura’s side were unable to carve open a resolute Swedish defence which sat deep and often had a line of six defenders camped in their box, heading away each cross and set-piece into the box.In all, the Swedes made a total of 56 clearances between them, plus 19 interceptions.Both sides could have been awarded penalties: first Ludwig Augustinsson brought down Marco Parolo with a clumsy challenge while Manchester United’s Matteo Darmian and Juventus veteran Andrea Barzagli were fortunate to escape with handballs for Italy.Lazio striker Immobile, who has 14 club goals this season, hit the side-netting from a tight angle early on and struck a first-time shot wide from close range in the second half.Many of the Italy players fell to the ground at the full-time whistle, with strikers Andrea Belotti and Immobile reduced to tears, as the Swedes ran off to enthusiastically celebrate their qualification for next summer’s tournament in Russia.Italy’s legendary goalkeeper, Gianluca Buffon, ended his illustrious career on a sad note.“I leave a squad of talent that will have their say, including Gigio Donnarumma and Mattia Perin. I want to give a hug to Chiello, Barza, Leo and Lele, who I had almost 10 years alongside. I thank the lads who were with us and, although it wasn’t enough, I hope that we gave them something.“In football you win as a group, you lose as a group, you divide the credit and the blame. The coach is part of this entire group,” observed a sad Buffon last night.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more