Classic Tours opens bookings for ‘Trek the Inca Trail’

first_img Howard Lake | 19 April 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Classic Tours has announced that bookings for ‘Trek the Inca Trail’, 26 August – 4 September 2006, are now available.Classic Tours offer a range of adventurous overseas expeditions which enable participants to raise vital funds for a chosen charity. Other challenges available in 2006 include trekking through the tropical wilderness of Brazil, cycling from the Great Wall of China to Tiananmen Square, climbing Mount Etna in Sicily, swimming and trekking along the Lycian Way in Turkey and running 100km from the Great Wall of China to the Ming Tombs.Registration fees range from £150-£250, paid by the participant as a commitment to raise funds for the charity of their choice. The minimum sponsorship requirement is £1,350-£2,650 per person. Advertisement Tagged with: Events Giving/Philanthropy Volunteering Classic Tours opens bookings for ‘Trek the Inca Trail’ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

OCBP FINISHES IN 2ND PLACE OVERALL AT THE 2018 DUTCH HOFFMAN MEMORIAL LIFEGUARD RACES

first_imgPaddleboard:5th – Cape May4th – Longport3rd – Sea isle City2nd – Ocean CIty (Bryan Theiss)1st – Wildwood CrestOCBP 1st place winner Maggie Wallace finishing the Swim Race, repeating her performance from last year.Swim:5th – North Wildwood4th – Longport3rd – Atlantic City2nd – Wildwood Crest1st – Ocean City (Maggie Wallace)OCBP rookie Artur Menezes, center left, competing in the 2 mile Beach Run Race.Beach Run:5th – Avalon4th – Stone Harbor3rd – Sea Isle CIty2nd – Upper Township1st – WildwoodOCBP Shanin Theiss coming in from the Singles Row Race.Singles Row:5th – Atlantic CIty4th – Brigantine3rd – Longport2nd – Cape May Point1st – VentnorOCBP Maggie Wallace holding her 1st Place Swim Race Award.Team Standings:5th – Atlantic City 6 points4th – Upper Township 7 points3rd – Wildwood Crest 9 points2nd – Ocean City 9 points (tie breaker)1st – Longport 12 pointsOCBP Bryan Theiss, 2nd place winner in the Paddleboard race. Start of the Swim Race. OCBP Maggie Wallace in lower pink cap won the race. (Photo Credits: Dale Braun) Friday night, the OCBP competed in the 49th annual Dutch Hoffman Memorial Lifeguard Races, coming in 2nd place overall as a team.  This competition is the 1st of the “Big 3” races, which was held in Wildwood with dark overcast skies and rough wind blown waters that caused problems for many of the competitors.OCBP Maggie Wallace coming in 1st place in the Swim Race. This is her 2nd consecutive year winning this race.OCBP Maggie Wallace defended her historic win from last year’s swim race with another 1st place finish this year and is again the only female to ever win a race in the “Big 3”.  In an exciting and closest of race finishes in recent memory, OCBP Bryan Theiss had come towards the shore with a comfortable lead in the Paddleboard Race, but a powerful wave had knocked him off his board.  His experience in paddleboarding allowed him to get back on, but he had lost his lead at this point.  Once he reach the beach, however, he sped down the beach and managed to dive across the finish line first and was initially awarded the 1st place stick, but after a judge’s review it was determined that the Wildwood Crest competitor’s legs had actually crossed first and Bryan was then awarded a 2nd place finish.In the Doubles Row Race, OCBP Sean McCann and Hunter Devine came in ahead of the Wildwood Crest team to allow Ocean City to take 2nd place in the team standing in a tie breaker with WWC.  The following are the results:OCBP Sean McCann and Hunter Devine coming in from the Doubles Row Race. Their efforts broke a tie breaker for the OCBP team overall to capture 2nd place.Doubles Row:5th – Wildwood4th – Atlantic City3rd – Upper Township2nd – Cape May1st – Longportlast_img read more

Governor Wolf and Health Secretary Expand ‘Stay at Home’ Order to Nine More Counties to Mitigate Spread of COVID-19, Counties Now Total 19

first_imgGovernor Wolf and Health Secretary Expand ‘Stay at Home’ Order to Nine More Counties to Mitigate Spread of COVID-19, Counties Now Total 19 March 27, 2020 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Press Release,  Public Health Nine new counties include Berks, Butler, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Luzerne, Pike, Wayne, Westmoreland and YorkGovernor Wolf’s Amended OrderSecretary of Health’s Amended OrderStay at Home GuidanceAs the state continues to seek relief to save lives and stop the spread of COVID-19, today Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine revised their “Stay at Home” orders to include nine additional counties – Berks, Butler, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Luzerne, Pike, Wayne, Westmoreland and York – bringing the state total to 19 counties under a stay-at-home order. This order takes effect at 8:00 PM Friday, March 27, 2020, and will continue until April 6, 2020.The order now includes these 19 counties: Allegheny, Berks, Bucks, Butler, Chester, Delaware, Erie, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia, Pike, Wayne, Westmoreland and York counties.Individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following allowable individual activities and allowable essential travel:Tasks essential to maintain health and safety, or the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets), such as obtaining medicine or medical supplies, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from homeGetting necessary services or supplies for themselves, for their family or household members, or as part of volunteer efforts, or to deliver those services or supplies to others to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residencesEngaging in outdoor activity, such as walking, hiking or running if they maintain social distancingTo perform work providing essential products and services at a life-sustaining businessTo care for a family member or pet in another householdAny travel related to the provision of or access to the above-mentioned individual activities or life-sustaining business activitiesTravel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable personsTravel to or from educational institutions for purposes of receiving materials for distance learning, for receiving meals, and any other related servicesTravel to return to a place of residence from an outside jurisdictionTravel required by law enforcement or court orderTravel required for non-residents to return to their place of residence outside the commonwealthAnyone performing life-sustaining travel does not need paperwork to prove the reason for travel.The following operations are exempt:Life-sustaining business activitiesHealth care or medical services providersAccess to life-sustaining services for low-income residents, including food banksAccess to child care services for employees of life-sustaining businesses that remain open as follows: child care facilities operating under the Department of Human Services, Office of Child Development and Early Learning waiver process; group and family child care operating in a residence; and part-day school age programs operating under an exemption from the March 19, 2020 business closure OrdersNews mediaLaw enforcementThe federal governmentReligious institutionsIndividuals experiencing homelessness are not subject to this order but are strongly urged to find shelter and government agencies are urged to take steps needed to provide shelter for those individuals.International students, foster youth, and any other students who would otherwise experience displacement or homelessness as a result of campus closures are exempt and may remain in campus housing.At this time, law enforcement will be focused on ensuring that residents are aware of the order and informing the public of social distancing practices rather than enforcement. To report a noncompliant business, contact your local law enforcement agency’s non-emergency number or the nearest Pennsylvania State Police station. Please do not call 911 or the Department of Community and Economic Development to file reports. Law enforcement officers should refer to Business Closure Order Enforcement Guidance available online.Read Governor Wolf’s original order here or view on Scribd. Read Governor Wolf’s amended order here or view on Scribd.Read Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine’s original order here or view on Scribd. Read Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine’s amended order here or view on Scribd.For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, Pennsylvanians should visit: https://www.pa.gov/guides/responding-to-covid-19/.View this information in Spanish here.last_img read more

Concussions a greater problem for Black youth

first_imgPresident Barack Obama speaks in the East Room at the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 29, 2014, during the White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussion Summit. Obama was hosting a summit with representatives of professional sports leagues, coaches, parents, young athletes, researchers and others to call attention to the issue of youth sports concussions. Pictured from left to right: LaVar Arrington, former NFL linebacker; Victoria Bellucci, a high school soccer player from Huntingtown, Md.; Taylor Twellman, former professional soccer player; Gen. Ray Odierno, Chief of Staff of the United States Army. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) WASHINGTON (NNPA) – Despite the flurry of news about NFL lawsuits over concussions, the problem affects far more athletes at the high school and junior high school level, according to the federal government statistics.In 2009 alone, nearly 250,000 youth age 19 or younger were treated in emergency rooms for sports and recreation-related injuries that included concussions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Between 2001 and 2009, the rate of such visits rose 57 percent.Concussions occur when the brain is shaken violently against the skull. Although concussions are the most common brain injury, widespread awareness and concern about this issue in the world of student athletics is fairly recent.But it is especially relevant for Black communities, particularly young men most likely to die from traumatic brain injuries, according to the CDC. And according to data from research nonprofit, Child Trends, 50 to 60 percent of Black American high schoolers were on a sports team in 2011.In severe or untreated cases, they can cause brain damage, seizures, emotional distress, and death—in fact the CDC estimates that 5.3 million U.S. citizens are living with disability as a result of a traumatic brain injury (or TBI, an umbrella term that includes concussions).“From an athletic trainer perspective concussions have always been a big concern. Coaches seemed to think that injuries increased because [athletic trainers] were there, but really it’s that awareness is increased,” says Jennifer Rheeling, a veteran athletic trainer in D.C. Public Schools and chair of the Sports Medicine Advisory Committee for the D.C. State Athletic Association.“In the last five years particularly with the NFL starting to talk about it, and the lawsuits, has helped immensely now that people get it on a mainstream level. What they thought was just getting their bell rung was really a concussion.”On the most diligent and well-resourced student teams, players take baseline tests—a battery of motor skill drills and survey questions to record their individual peak cognitive health—and have athletic trainers who check for signs of decline. If a concussion is suspected, a player does another test to compare those results to his or her baseline. The ImPACT Concussion Management program is currently the program of record for these tests among school athletic programs.But according to Dr. Vernon Williams, neurologist and medical director of the Sports Concussion Institute, a lack of access to care compounds the (now fading) problem of awareness. ImPACT, for example, costs a minimum of $400 per year for 100 baseline tests and 15 post-injury tests for one school. Meanwhile, many schools and school districts, largely populated by Black and brown children, routinely have to make cuts to balance their budget.“We have coaches who understand the need, but they have different resources. For example, we know baseline testing for people in contact collision sports can help evaluate when people get injured,” Dr. Williams explains. “But it’s uncommon for people to have access to state-of-the-art baseline testing. Players, school systems, and parents don’t have access to those funds. But we can still implement treatment using creative measures.”Currently, Dr. Gary Harris, who specializes in computer engineering and serves as associate provost for Research and Graduate Studies at Howard University, is working with engineering students and the Bison football team to devise an inexpensive concussion monitoring system, using an open source platform.(“Open source” is a tech industry term that means the equipment and information to create this system is public as opposed to proprietary, so as to encourage others to innovate and improve on the idea).The project uses a computer chip attached inside the helmet that measures impact up to 100 gs of force. For reference: a sneeze is about 2 or 3 gs of force on the human body; an F-16 fighter jet barrel roll exerts 7 to 9 gs; a car crash at 45 mph is about 60 gs. Concussions usually happen with collisions between 80 and 120 gs.The chip records the force of impact for every collision—it can be programed to transmit this information wirelessly, say, to a cell phone app. Or, it can be downloaded from the helmet using a USB cable. It can also be programed to send an alert when a hit exceeds a certain threshold.“You can have an entire team’s list where you know all their shock, trauma, and incidents on file,” says Dr. Harris. “We still don’t know the threshold of force for brain damage, we don’t know how many hits it takes, but the first thing we have to do is collect the data.”Each of these chips costs approximately $30.Technology is also being used to improve care and outcomes the aftermath of serious concussion cases. Interactive Metronome, a health tech company that creates neurological research-based brain training programs and activities, is one example. The activities are designed around “brain timing”—the ability to clap to a beat, for example. As users play games and do activities that test their reaction time, those brain cell connections are repaired and strengthened. Originally (and primarily) used to improve motor skills and cognitive function in children with ADD/ADHD, the program is beginning to see success with TBI rehabilitation.“We fit into concussions in a new way, which is helping out when those [post-concussion] symptoms don’t dissipate,” says Nick Etten, vice president of Strategy and Business Development at Interactive Metronome. “There’s a lot of emphasis on technology these days—it’s really important in the world of concussions and cognitive rehab. We’re starting to understand that there was a big void in information.”Technology has helped improve identifying and treating concussions; on the prevention front, sports health care professionals now have the backing of the law. In all 50 states, a student athlete must be immediately removed from play if a concussion is suspected, and cannot return to practice or play without medical clearance. Some states also mandate that a student must remain free of symptoms or remain on the injured list for a set period of time, even if they gain medical clearance immediately.But there are still holes in preventing these injuries.“There’s clearly benefits to legislation in terms of drawing attention to the issue of concussions and having some foundation across the board with how they should be managed,” says Dr. Williams. “I think there are some variables…related to who should be allowed to clear players.”He and Rheeling have both seen athletes on under-resourced teams get clearance from an emergency room resident, for example, in contrast with athletes who take a concussion test against their baseline with their team’s athletic trainer. They’ve also seen instances of students underreporting their symptoms, coaches resisting care recommendations, and parents being lax in monitoring their child’s rest after a concussion.Emerging laws are attempting to add another layer of protection by regulating the number of weekly practices involving rough contact drills, thus reducing exposure to collisions and risk of concussion. Trainers, coaches, parents, and athletes can also receive guidance through resources such as the American Academy of Neurology online Sports Concussion Toolkit, and organizations such as the Sports Legacy Network.“We’re at the end of the beginning as relates to concussion management. We’re learning more every day and the process will continue to evolve,” says Dr. Williams. “We’re out of the phase of explaining what a concussion is, identifying symptoms…. It’s no longer an unrecognized epidemic, we’re aware of the issues and that [a concussion] has to be managed effectively.”last_img read more

Summer Is Our Time At The Shore

first_imgBy Joseph Sapia Summer season crowds leave. Oppressive heat disappears, but it is still warm. The sun projects a softer light. Wildlife migrates. The foliage is changing colors.The magic of September at the Jersey Shore.“Don’t tell anybody,” laughed Cindy Zipf, executive director of the Clean Ocean Action.But, then, she added, “The secret’s out.”Secretly or not secretly, Shore people speak in wonder of September along the coast.“It is kind of magical,” said Margaret Mass, executive direc- tor of the Red Bank Visitors Center. “It’s a way to still enjoy the waterfront experience.“It’s kind of nice people can get into their favorite restaurants without a line,” Mass said. “It’s not too cold, not too hot.”Caitlin Over, 31, of Atlantic Highlands and Alissa Snell, 36, of Red Bank were leaving the Sea Bright beach, where both have season badges, on a recent day. While both are educators – Over, a guidance counselor at Howell High School and Snell, a school psychologist at Neptune High School – their summer is not over.September, Over said, “it’s my favorite local summer.”“The water’s warm, the beach is quiet, it’s just easy,” Snell said. “Everybody on the beach we know is a local.“It’s just more relaxed,” she added. “More people know their beach etiquette – don’t sit close to someone else, don’t blare music, throw garbage away, watch your kids.”Some wrongly think September is the end of beach season, said Olivia Rauso, 19, of Red Bank.“I think it’s really great, if you take adavantage of it,” said Rauso. “On Sandy Hook, it’s migrating season,” Dillingham said.Monarch butterflies and fall warblers are heading south, for example. “You start to notice that change,” Dillingham said.Zipf, whose Clean Ocean Action environmental group also is based at Sandy Hook, noted the changing of colors – the “bright yellow” of goldenrod and the ocean’s water, for example.“The water gets a reflection from the sun that’s deeper, crisper,” said Zipf, who has spent all of her 57 years at the Shore. “Foliage starts turning red. The air is crisper. It’s a beautiful time of year.”Pat MacMillan, 66, a recently retired Perth Amboy schools administrator who lives in Fair Haven, noted how September is a great time for town and beach.“We always try to get to the beach in September,” MacMillan said. “It’s quiet. You can go to the end of September. “You can go to restaurants, walk around without the crowds,” MacMillan said. “September is the best.”This September, MacMillan will do local trips to Ocean Grove and Island Beach State Park, along with vacationing at Acadia National Park on the Maine coast.Rauso, on the other hand, is headed back to school at Montclair State University. “As soon as I’m at Montclair, I miss the beach,” Rauso said. “It’s the best-kept secret, September at the beach,” Rauso said.But the secret is out….center_img For locals, September is sort of a Take Back the Shore.“You can look at it as our time,” said Laurie Potter of Rumson. “It can be a time to enjoy our own backyard.”But Potter, co-owner of River Road Books in Fair Haven, noted the “juxtaposition,” when the Jersey Shore’s traditional summer season of Memorial Day to Labor Day transitions with the coming of September.“You can go out to all the places you don’t want to get near in the summer,” Potter said.However, tourism also helps businesses, Potter said. And tourism takes advantage of September. For example, in Red Bank, the Guinness Oyster Festival is Sunday, Sept. 25, at the White Street Parking Lot.“We definitely enjoy a nice shoulder season, Red Bank being the gateway to the Shore area,” Mass said. “Temperatures go down, free beaches.“Beautiful weather,” Mass said. “We, sometime, have the nicest weather, September weather.”“It can be the best weather of the year, in September,” Potter agreed.“People feel it’s a good time to get out,” Mass said.The natural world, too, changes.“The way I always know it’s September is the gulls and terns wing dance,” said Tim Dillingham, executive director of the American Littoral Society, a Sandy Hook-based coastal conservation group. “They’re flying around, grabbing these (flying) ants.last_img read more

Bombers open against top-ranked Southridge at Triple-A Boys Basketball Championships

first_img“However, this Storm team isn’t shy at shooting from the outside so it will be a challenge to defend inside and out.”The Bombers have some experience of their on the roster.Grade 12 seniors Josh Matosevic, Robby Dixon and Jake Anderson are all making their third straight trip to the provincial tournament.Matosevic’s 21 provincial point average and 12 rebounds will be counted on to lead the Bomber attack.Dixon will do his damage leading the Bomber arsenal from the point guard position while Anderson, who is battling the flu, averages 12 points a game.Also counted on for points and defence is Grade 11 Vinnie Watson, also making his third trip to the tournament.“We aren’t deep with only nine players on our roster including two Grade 10’s — Brock and Dyllan Dixon — so our success depends on our ability to stay healthy,” Phelan said.“Seven of our 14 losses came during injuries to our two best players  —Josh Matosevic and Rob Dixon — where we lost often narrowly by less than 10 pts.”The game tips off at 1:45 p.m. Wednesday afternoon.Win, and the Bomber move along the championship trail to play at 3:30 p.m. Thursday.A loss drops LVR into the consolation side of the 16-team tournament against the loser of Mark Isfeld of Courtenayand Duchess Park of Prince George. It’s never easy playing high school basketball in the Kootenays.Tons of travel due to weak competition inside the zone makes it tough for program to succeed.And when it comes to playing at the provincials, it gets even tougher.The L.V. Rogers Bombers take the place of David against Goliath as the Kootenay reps meet top ranked Southridge of Surrey on opening day of the BC High School AAA Boy’s Basketball Championships Wednesday the Langley Events Centre.“Most team’s schedules wrap up at the end of the season where they have to compete just to get a shot at making the provincials. . .. We are fortunate enough that we essentially have a bye to provincials because we have been so beat up in the past 2-3 weeks that if we had to play anyone it would have been tough to field a healthy squad,” said Bomber coach Jeremy Phelan, a two-time provincial champion during his high school career at Trafalgar and LVR.“But coming into this week we seem to have kicked the sick bug and our key guys with injuries have had some down time to recover from a grueling travel schedule which saw us travel to the Okanagan or Lower Mainland on six separate occasions.”Phelan said Southridge returns three starters from last year. One of the returnees is versatile 6’8” center in Hunter Hughes.“We have been preparing to stop him,” Phelan explained.last_img read more

3 Reasons Why Digital Detox Is So Enticing

first_imgA Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit But, most of all, I did nothing – and it was great. I could physically feel my head rising above the water again as the stream of information subsided. My wife told me I was more fun to be around, probably because I wasn’t tutting at my phone every 10 seconds.Can digital detoxing help you relax, unclutter your mind and make you happier?It’s no use asking me. There’s only one way to find out. Are you brave enough to try it?Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Guest author Sam Hailes is a freelance journalist from the UK.“What does this button do?”  That was the cryptic yet clever final tweet from John Mayer in 2010 when he abandoned his 3.7 million followers.5% off your food bill. That was the offer that LA restaurant Eva gave to customers who surrendered access to their mobile phone for the duration of their meal.“Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage.” That is the error message that frustrates, angers and infuriates millions of people across the world.What has happened to us?15 years ago nobody banked online, updated their status or Instagrammed their food. Now, we’re all doing it. Even that last one (admit it). Plugging in to the Web has many benefits. But for some the whole experience has become overwhelming. Could interest in the Internet really be waning?Perhaps.A growing chorus is rising up from people glued to their computer screens. They complain of distracting noise and nonsense dominating their Twitter feeds and Facebook timelines.Quit The Web Or Quit Smoking?If switching off sounds tough, though, you’re not alone. A 2011 survey found participants complaining that digital detoxing was about as difficult as quitting smoking.Still, plenty of people are giving it a try. During the Christmas 2012 period, some 600,000 UK users deleted their Facebook accounts. Being online, especially when viewed through the lens of making and building friendships, may not be as cool as it used to be.Web users are discovering three big problems:1. Too Big To Keep UpThe Web allows almost anyone to become a publisher, and various guestimates put the number of active blogs at a whopping 450 million. And that’s just the ones written in English!The sheer quantity of information has become overwhelming, and it continues to grow exponentially. That’s great for Wikipedia, but not so great for our brains.2. Clogged BrainsThe average American consumes 100,500 words a day. Three quarters of our waking day is spent consuming information. The effects can be stupifying as well as enlightening.Have you ever had a day when you’ve done nothing but stare at a screen yet feel as if you’ve just run a marathon? Do you have more than 10 tabs open in your browser most of the time? Do you have social media apps on your phone, always running in the background?While our brains may need to stop and switch off, occasionally, the Internet never takes a break.3. Driving Us To DistractionWhether you spend hours looking at pictures of cats or The Huffington Post, the problem is the same. You’re distracting yourself with information. The knowledge that there’s so much information out there just waiting to be consumed makes us jumpy. We barely digest one cute cat picture before moving on to a top 10 list. (Heck, I’m be surprised you’re still reading this!)Switching OffIs it any wonder that more people are switching off – even if only for a limited time? The feedback from those who’ve tried it is nearly unanimously positive.Talking about the two week period when he denied himself Internet access, Mark Hooper wrote in the Observer:I read more, I cooked more, I wrote a few postcards (and managed to forget to leave enough space for the stamp). I drew. I went on long walks. I drove to Hastings and ate chips on the beach. I watched more curling in the Winter Olympics than I would have thought humanly possible. I rediscovered the rare thrill of staying up until midnight on a Saturday night to see if my football team had won (we’re in the Championship) or – better yet – only finding out when I opened the Sunday papers. Tags:#Pause Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos sam hailes Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationlast_img read more

Tips to enjoy the Canada Day Parade in Fort St John

first_imgThe parade procession starts from the North Peace Arena parking lot and will travel North up 100 Street, turn right onto 108 Ave, turn right onto 98 street, left onto 100 Ave, and right onto 96 street to head back to the North Peace arena. The North Peace Arena parking and the back parking lot of the Pomeroy Sport Centre will be closed as a holding (marshalling) area for the floats to prep and unload after the parade. These lots will open to the public once the parade is over (approximately 1:00 pm).Those wishing to attend the parade should consider the following tips for success:Be EARLY (parking lots are limited and fill up fast)Park your vehicle and walk (it will be difficult to get a vehicle too close to 100 Street/Centennial Park)Save your spot on the sidewalk for the parade (do not sit on the road and bring your lawn chair!)Be aware that road closures will be in effect as early as 9:00 am on the day ofBe patient & polite (people running the barricades are volunteers)Obey ALL signs and orders from traffic control and barricade volunteersBe sun smart and stay hydrated!Supervise your children closely and keep them from going onto the road during the paradeStay informed! Follow the “City of Fort St. John Recreation” Facebook page for regular updatesHAVE FUN and celebrate our AMAZING country!It is important to note that the parade route does a loop. There will be a high congestion zone on 97Ave, 98Ave, and 99 Ave between 96Street and 100 Street from 11:00am-12:00 pm as surrounding roads will be blocked by the parade. It is recommended that anyone who chooses to park their vehicle in this area (near No Frills, Salvation Army, and the surrounding residential areas) do not attempt to drive until after 12:00 pm to avoid this congestion.Here is a copy of the Canada Day Parade Route FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With Canada Day set for Monday, the City of Fort St. John has shared tips to enjoy the Canada Day Parade.The Canada Day Parade will take place on July 1 at 11:00 am. This parade is volunteer-based featuring a variety of entries from non-profit organizations, businesses, and more. For safety purposes, the City has will be enforcing road closures, detours, and partial road closures. The main road closure will take place on 100 Street from 93 Ave to the south side of 100 Ave. This will be enforced by 9:00 am on the day of and will not open until after 12:00 pm.There will be roving entertainers on 100 Street between 93 and 95 Ave around 10:15 am to perform for those waiting for the parade to begin.last_img read more

NCAER NIPFP to get funds from US eBay founders Omidyar Network

first_imgNew Delhi: Omidyar Network India Tuesday said it will provide Rs 16 crore (USD 2.3 million) grant to Brookings India, NCAER and NIPFP to conduct research on issues related to property rights in the country. The grant would be utilised to create a multi-organisation research consortium that will focus on issues linked to secure rights to assets, Omidyar Network said in a statement. The Rs 16-crore fund includes an innovation fund of Rs 3.5 crore (USD 500,000) to back proposals from across the country. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalBrookings India, National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) and National Institute of Public Finance Policy (NIPFP) would develop “evidence-based solutions to address chronic challenges in providing secure access to land, housing and property rights”. Omidyar Network India is part of a global network funded by the philanthropic capital of Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, and his wife Pam Omidyar. “The aim is to have these institutions, and hopefully other collaborators in the future, develop in-house expertise on important issues that are relevant for policy makers, build evidence around these issues and propose solutions that can truly improve the lives of people on the ground. said Shreya Deb, Director, Investments, at Omidyar Network India. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostNIPFP’s Professor Ila Patnaik said the consortium brings together many research institutions and experts and the knowledge it will generate will break new ground, and have a far-reaching impact. “I expect that the work we do as a whole will add up to more than the sum of the parts. And as the consortium grows, we will be growing India’s research capacity to deal with challenging land issues. Our own NCAER Land Policy Initiative will break new ground on gauging how the Indian states are doing on modernising their land records. said Shekhar Shah, Director-General, NCAER. Shamika Ravi, Director (Research) at Brookings India said well-defined and secure property rights are fundamental to the economic progress of a society. All participating institutions in the consortium will share their knowledge, as well as their networks and data sets, to enable more collaborative learning and research. Omidyar Network India makes equity investments in early stage enterprises and provide grants to non-profits in the areas of digital identity, education, emerging tech, financial inclusion, governance and citizen engagement, and property rights.last_img read more

Mens soccer rebounds with pair of wins

After two rough games last week, the Ohio State men’s soccer team rebounded well, getting a tough win against Oakland last Wednesday and a 2-0 win Friday night against Cleveland State. “We stumbled a little last week, but to respond from the two bad games and to get back on the right track was very good,” coach John Bluem said. “I am proud of the guys. It was a good team effort in both of our wins this week, so I am very happy right now for the team.”Under cloudy and rainy conditions at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, the Buckeyes struck early, two minutes into the game.After a great pass from Buckeye forward Chris Hegngi, who crossed the ball to Austin McAnena, McAnena got the ball and drilled it into the upper-right corner of the goal to give OSU a 1-0 advantage.“That was all Chris,” midfielder Austin McAnena said. “I was just on the back end of that. It was a great pass right on the money. I give the credit to Chris and the rest of the team.”Midfielder Matt Gold was the player who initially started the play with an outlet pass to Hegngi. For the freshman McAnena, it was his third goal of the season. “They’ve done that a couple of times this year,” Bluem said. “Those two freshmen are really good players, and they play more like upperclassmen.”OSU added another quick goal in the 19th minute of play when senior co-captain Doug Verhoff scored his fourth goal of the season.Verhoff launched a free kick from 25 yards out that bent around and went into the goal, which gave OSU its 2-0 score.From start to finish, the Buckeyes dominated, playing much more aggressively and very physically. Cleveland State displayed a sense of frustration, with five yellowcards by the end of the game.For goalie Matt Lampson, it was his fifth shutout of the season. The redshirt freshman had five saves on the day and he improved his record to 5-1-2 on the year.Last Wednesday saw the Buckeyes matched up against Oakland, a rematch of last year’s second-round tournament game. OSU defeated Oakland 1-0 after sophomore Joshua Breto scored the game’s only goal.The Buckeyes will remain at home when they return to action Wednesday against the University of Illinois-Chicago. Game time for the non-conference matchup is 7 p.m. read more