H-2A Certified Positions Surpass 258,000

first_img By American Farm Bureau Federation – Dec 5, 2019 In fiscal year 2019, the H-2A farm labor program set a record for certified positions, which is the number of applications processed and approved. According to Veronica Nigh, American Farm Bureau Federation Economist, more than 258,000 certified positions is considered a milestone.“Passing the 250,000 positions is a big deal,” said Nigh. “This is the seventh consecutive year with increases in the H-2A program. A few years ago, the H-2A program was a vary minor part of U.S. on-farm employment.”While the national Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AEWR) will increase in 2020 to $13.99, a 6 percent increase from 2019, Nigh said increases will vary by region.“The region with the smallest growth rate of 1 percent is the Mountain 1 region of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming,” she said. “You compare that to the Corn Belt 1 region which includes Ohio, Indiana and Illinois and they’re looking at a 10 percent increase in wages compared to 2019.”Nigh said commodity prices are not keeping up with the growth in the AEWR, causing some concern for specialty crop growers.“The receipts data we see for fruits, nuts and vegetables haven’t kept pace with the growth in the AEWR,” said Nigh. “Over the last five years, the total cash receipts for those specialty crop growers have increased by 2 percent between 2015 and 2019 while the national AEWR increased by 17 percent.” Home Indiana Agriculture News H-2A Certified Positions Surpass 258,000 SHARE H-2A Certified Positions Surpass 258,000 SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleRanking Member Stabenow Applauds $24 Million for Farm Bill Climate-Smart Agriculture ProjectsNext articleIndiana Farm Applicator Brings Home Harley-Davidson Hardware American Farm Bureau Federation Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

In ACC Tournament with short turnarounds, SU needs its best when it usually gets its worst

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Following Syracuse’s third loss in seven days, head coach Gary Gait judged his team as “tired and flat-footed.” The Orange had just been steamrolled by Duke, 17-10, in the Carrier Dome and Gait proposed that the signs of a blowout were present before Syracuse stepped on the field.“With one day of rest, one day of preparation, those are the games we don’t play well,” Gait said after the Duke game. “It’s unfortunate. It’s just the nature of the schedule this year.”He’s admitted that few things have gone according to plan for No. 19 Syracuse (9-8,1-6 Atlantic Coast) this season. A shortened fall ball, a rash of injuries and lack of conference wins has placed the Orange firmly on the NCAA Tournament bubble, Gait said. But SU’s schedule hasn’t helped. The Orange has often encountered a slew of games in a week, meaning there’s a day or two to prepare for an often top-ranked opponent.Thursday’s ACC tournament in Durham, North Carolina, potentially has the No. 6-seed Orange playing three games in four days. The stretch begins against second-seeded North Carolina (12-3, 6-1), which beat SU 20-11 earlier this month in the Dome. To extend its season into May, Syracuse will likely need to upset the Tar Heels and then succeed in a format that has been its foil.“We’re banged up,” Gait said, “and we’ve scrambled and tried to get through the number of games in a short amount of time. It’s been tough. We’re hoping to regroup, get through this week … and do what we need to do.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe stumble against the Blue Devils was the Orange’s fourth contest in seven days. Syracuse started that stretch with a 11-10 overtime loss against Notre Dame on March 24, followed by a 14-10 breakdown at Northwestern two days later, and a 17-16 win in Princeton on March 29.2018’s gauntlet was determined by factors outside of Gait’s control, he said. The Carrier Dome was set to undergo renovations during the season, he said – so SU hadn’t finalized its 2018 slate. When it turned out that the SU would be able to play on its home turf, it was too late. Most other teams had finalized their schedule, leaving the Orange with short layovers between matchups.A consequence of this has often materialized in mental errors, players and coaches said. Passes in the midfield are forced and result in turnovers. Defensive slides aren’t as crisp. Assistant coach Caitlin Defliese attributed SU’s uptick in fouls to mental fatigue, too.“We try to put a lot of prep behind each game,” sophomore defender Lila Nazarian said. “It’s really hard to have a 24-48 hour turnaround and be ready to play a totally different team. We do the best we can, but sometimes we’re just not as prepared as we want to be.”This year, SU has turned to its man-to-man defense at a higher rate, players said. At times, it has tried to switch to a zone scheme based on the opponent, but the quick switch has been difficult with fewer practices.The Orange’s first compact stretch spanned a week in early March. It started with a 17-16 defeat against Virginia on March 4. Syracuse upset Florida, 17-15 on March 7, and was crushed by Maryland, 18-11, four days later. SU’s backline conceded 50 goals, the most it allowed in a three-game period all season.“We’re not as dialed in as we need to be,” Nazarian added, “and that’s when the fundamentals come away.”Syracuse implements fundamental drills when it typically has a few days between matchups, sophomore attack Emily Hawryschuk said. Defenders work on boxing out, and attackers go over dodging techniques. Players push themselves harder in these practices because the extended layoff allows their bodies to recover, Hawryschuk said.Alternatively, practices the day before a game consist of seven versus seven, set plays, and clearing practice, junior defender Alexa Radziewicz said. After film breakdowns of both SU’s play and its upcoming opponent, there isn’t a lot of time for much else.In preparing for Thursday’s game, some coaches have argued that the earlier, condensed run of games give SU an advantage. Before Hawryschuk hopped on the team bus on Tuesday, she tried to echo the same sentiment.“The schedule this year, it was …,” she said before her voice trailed off. “It was tough the way it was set up. But, it does prepare you for situations like this. I think our bodies will be prepared for it. That’s the big thing.”With its season potentially on the brink, SU will follow the same formula it did earlier in 2018. This time, it hopes for different results. Comments Published on April 25, 2018 at 9:08 pm Contact Nick: [email protected] | @nick_a_alvarezlast_img read more

Clippers coach Doc Rivers denies report he’s interested in Lakers job

first_imgDoc Rivers has addressed rumors concerning him and the Lakers.The Clippers coach has been linked to the other job in Los Angeles. But, he told reporters Tuesday there was “no truth” to those reports. “I just wanted to make sure it was the right fit for all of us. Everybody we’ve brought in, I absolutely think the world of. As far as a workplace, this is a great place to work.” – more Doc Rivers— Mirjam Swanson (@MirjamSwanson) March 20, 2019The Clippers enter Tuesday at 41-30 and hold the last playoff spot in the Western Conference. Although they traded their leading scorer, Tobias Harris, to the 76ers, they appear likely to make the postseason and are set to be in the race to sign top free agents this summer.The Lakers, on the other hand, don’t seem likely to creep into the playoff race, as they sit 9 1/2 games behind the Clippers with 11 regular season games remaining. Warriors’ Draymond Green on Kevin Durant’s free agency: ‘Whatever happens this summer happens’ NBA free agency rumors: Pistons interested in bringing back Reggie Bullockcenter_img Related News Doc Rivers says there is no truth to the report that he is interested in being the next Lakers head coach.— Jovan Buha (@jovanbuha) March 20, 2019Rivers said he is “close friends” with Lakers president Magic Johnson. However, he said his job “is not done” with the Clippers.Doc Rivers: “Let me end this. Magic Johnson & I are very close friends…but Steve Ballmer and I have a great relationship. He gave me an out, where I could opt-out this summer…early this year, let’s end this thing, extend, make it a longer deal. I’m here. My job is not done.”— Mirjam Swanson (@MirjamSwanson) March 20, 2019Rivers added the Clippers’ organization is a “great place to work.” last_img read more

QPR ‘aim to beat Everton and Sunderland to Rovers star’

first_imgQPR boss Mark Hughes plans to pip Cardiff City to the signing of Liverpool striker Craig Bellamy, the South Wales Echo believe.Cardiff are keen to take the Wales international back to the club where he had a loan spell, but it is suggested that Hughes is also interested in signing him.Linked with move for Bellamy.Hughes’ imminent signing of Park Ji-sung from Manchester United is among the headlines, with the Daily Mail suggesting Rangers have offered £5m for the Korean.Related West London Sport story: Korean star Park set to join QPR from UnitedQPR hope to beat off competition from Everton and Sunderland to capture winger Junior Hoilett from Blackburn, the Daily Mirror say.Former Rovers boss Hughes has been interested in signing Hoilett for some time.And it is claimed that he has offered more money than Everton, who are also keen on the Canadian.Hoilett is out-of-contract and plans to leave Ewood Park this summer. At 22, he is too young to move on a Bosman free transfer, so Blackburn will be due compensation unless they accept an offer.Sunderland and German club Borussia Monchengladbach are also said to be interested.Meanwhile, Wigan supremo Dave Whelan has warned Chelsea he will not cut his £10m asking price for Victor Moses, the Mail report.Chelsea are expected to bid about £7m with add-ons over the weekend. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Can We Just Pretend Morality Is Real?

first_imgA survey experiment showed that people who believe morals are like facts are more charitable than those who consider morals mere subjective opinions.In “‘Moral Realism’ May Lead to Better Moral Behavior,” Science Daily reported on a survey by Liane Young, assistant professor of psychology at Boston College.  Her survey team went out seeking donations for charity.  Before requesting money, the canvassers asked a leading question that “primed” the respondent to consider whether morality involves objective facts or mere cultural opinions.  The ones primed with “moral realism” gave more money.  Young got similar results with an online survey.  Control groups were not “primed” with the leading questions.Since “real” moral stakes may be accompanied by “real” consequences — whether good (e.g., helping others, enhanced self-esteem) or bad (e.g., retribution), priming a belief in moral realism may in fact prompt people to behave better, in line with their existing moral beliefs, the researchers say.This conclusion makes no judgment about moral realism or anti-realism.  It just states what works.This is a modern form of behaviorism: an amoral, godless psychological theory that denies the reality of mental states, and just observes outward behaviors.  Behaviorists seek to find what kinds of manipulative actions produce predictable behaviors.  But who decides what behavior is “better” without unchanging standards?  In the wrong hands, this kind of information could lead unscrupulous leaders to manipulate people for the leader’s own purposes.Either morality is real, like unchangeable facts, or it evolves.  If it evolves, what is considered evil today could become “good” in another time and culture.  Unless there are moral absolutes, therefore, there are no morals at all.  We need to promote “moral realism” not just because it produces someone’s opinion of desirable results, but because it is true. (Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Hackers For National Security Taking ‘Friendly’ Fire

first_imgGrowing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Terrorists could easily sabotage large portions of the nation’s critical infrastructure. Security is so weak in many industrial control systems that even an average hacker could shut down water and power plants, damage nuclear facilities and freeze automobile and aircraft assembly lines.The threat is so real that right or wrong, some security experts are publicly disclosing the weakest links to force action.The Security RenegadesLeading the renegades is Dale Peterson, founder of Sunrise, Fla.-based Digital Bond, which specializes in monitor, control and alarm systems for industrial plants. Peterson runs Project Basecamp, in which researchers demonstrate the fragility of critical control systems.Basecamp’s latest target was Germany-based Smart Software Solutions, better known as 3S. Peterson’s commandos found major vulnerabilities in 3S’ CoDeSys, a software tool for programmable logic controllers (PLCs), which are computers that automate industrial tasks, such as operating valves. More than 250 ICS makers use CoDeSys.The vulnerabilities would give access to the PLC upload code without an ID or password. That means a hacker would have full control of a controller. In exposing the weakness, Basecamp researchers also released exploit tools so 3S customers could test the vulnerabilities themselves.Inadequate ResponseThe Department of Homeland Security responded with an alert that recommended manufacturers “take defensive measures to minimize the risk of exploitation of these vulnerabilities.”Tuesday, 3S confirmed the problem, saying, “We take this issue very seriously and are currently working on a solution.”At the same time, the company acknowledged that securing its products against cyber attacks was not its focus. “In general, we do not offer any standard tools in CoDeSys which are to protect the controller from a serious cyber attack.”That attitude is exactly why Peterson launched Basecamp, which he insisted discloses vulnerabilities already known to hackers and the manufacturers. His goal is to get vendors to stop making industrial control products that are “insecure by design” and to fix what is already in use. So far, his strategy hasn’t worked.“They complain and everyone says that it shouldn’t be made public, yet we still don’t see it getting corrected,” Peterson said.Was Stuxnet Not Warning Enough?What can happen when hackers gain access to an industrial control system was demonstrated in Iran in 2010. A virus dubbed Stuxnet was unleashed in an Iranian nuclear facility, damaging centrifuges used to enrich uranium. The New York Times reported that the U.S. and Israeli governments developed the malware together.3S is not the first company targeted by Basecamp. The research group disclosed in January vulnerabilities in widely used PLCs made by General Electric, Rockwell Automation, Schneider Modicon, Koyo Electronics and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories.The researchers also have released exploit modules for some of the vulnerabilities in the popular Metasploit tool kit used by security experts and hackers.Homeland Security does not support the work of groups like Basecamp. Marty Edwards, director of the department’s Control Systems Security Program, told Wired the agency “does not encourage the release of sensitive vulnerability information” until a solution is ready for distribution.A ‘Pre-9/11 Moment’Partisan politics has prevented Congress from passing a cybersecurity bill to protect the nation from attacks on critical infrastructure. Lawmakers’ inaction comes as the Obama administration warns that a strike can happen at anytime.In a speech to a group of business leaders in New York this month, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said the nation needed to heed the warning signs and bolster its cyber defenses to avoid another tragedy like the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001. According to Panetta, the country is in a “pre-9/11 moment.”How far Congress will go to force manufacturers to secure industrial systems remains to be seen. Replacing or upgrading them would be expensive and companies would lobby hard against laws that would force them to make changes.“We’ve been very disappointed in the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. government,” Peterson said. “They have not said out loud that these devices are vulnerable and need to be replaced.” Peterson said he’ll continue exposing security weaknesses.His efforts are unlikely to produce much more than an occasional headline. Creating national cyber defenses requires forceful government action, private-public interaction and cooperation among companies and industries not seen since World War II. Let’s hope that happens before we’re hit again. Tags:#basecamp#cracking#cybersecurity#hacking#legislation#regulation#security#stuxnet Related Posts center_img antone gonsalves Why You Love Online Quizzes 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac…last_img read more

Maharashtra announces rehabilitation package for submerged villages

first_imgThe Maharashtra government has announced that villages that were fully submerged in the recent floods will be rehabilitated either on State land or private land that the government is willing to buy at market rate, said Chandrakant Patil, Cabinet Minister for Revenue, PWD (Excluding Undertakings) and Guardian Minister for Kolhapur and Pune, on Wednesday.The senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader said the plan will be put in place first for over 100 villages on an immediate basis. The first of the villages to be fully rehabilitated on revenue land will be in the vicinity of Pune. “If that is not available, we will rehabilitate the village on private land,” he said.The minister also took stock of the affected areas in the region and said the government is providing all the required assistance, including ₹5,000 as immediate relief and foodgrains. Mr. Patil said the government will do everything possible to rehabilitate over 300 submerged villages in Pune and Kolhapur. “It has also undertaken on a priority basis rehabilitation of damaged bridges. We are informing the victims of State benefits made available after the floods,” he said, after the tour on Wednesday. The Maharashtra Cabinet has already announced ₹6,813-crore assistance for flood-hit people, out of which ₹4,708 crore was allocated to Kolhapur, Sangli and Satara and ₹2,105 crore to the Konkan and Nashik.The State Cabinet has already decided to pay ₹16,602 as compensation towards the destruction of a pucca home while approving ₹5,200 for partial damages. Meanwhile, ₹4,000 will be compensated for a hutment. An estimated 23,000 homes have been destroyed while others have been partially damaged, officials said. Senior officials said the Cabinet has approved ₹222 crore for rebuilding homes and may eventually tap into schemes such as Ramai Awas Yojna and Shabri Gharkul Yojna. The floods have caused damage in over 750 villages, while near 4.5 lakh people have been displaced.last_img read more

10 months ago’Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-players

first_img‘Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-playersby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery earned himself a bizarre nickname while managing at Almeria.The Spaniard helped Almeria to promotion to La Liga in 2007 before earning his first big move by joining Valencia a year later.According to Romaine Molina, the author of Unai Emery: El Maestro, the 47-year-old was known as a football nut by his players.”He is mad for football, he loves it,” Molina revealed.”His nickname when he was younger was ‘infermo de futbol,’ which means ‘sick for football’.”That is what one of his former players Laurent de Palmas used to say.”He told me that the players thought he breathed football, he sleeps football, maybe he even f***s football.”And he wasn’t laughing, he was serious while he was telling me.”Emery has had an instant impact since replacing Arsene Wenger in the summer. The Gunners are currently three points behind fourth-placed Chelsea. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammates

first_imgHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammatesby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan’s owners Elliott Management are seriously considering ending the loan of Gonzalo Higuain.Corriere della Sera says Higuain is losing the confidence of management and teammates as he struggles for goals.On-loan from Juventus, Higuain can be signed permanently for €36m. But Elliott are now fast losing confidence in the deal.There are also concerns about Higuain’s status amongst the squad, where the younger players believe he is enjoying preferential treatment.Indeed, when Patrick Cutrone was hooked during the stalemate with Bologna ahead of his senior teammate, he was caught complaining to teammates in the dugout, “Why me?” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

This Yellow USC Concept Helmet Is A Pretty Interesting Design

first_imgA general view of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.LOS ANGELES – NOVEMBER 11: General view of action as the Oregon Ducks take on the USC Trojans on November 11, 2006 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The Trojans defeated the Ducks 35-10. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)When USC hits the field for the Holiday Bowl against Wisconsin on December 30, we expect the Trojans to wear their classic helmets. Going chrome with the current design is about the extend of what we see with alternate looks from the Trojans, but that doesn’t stop some of the internet’s top graphic designers from playing with some cool ideas for the program. Fresh Football Helmets and Deeyung Entertainment came up with a cool USC concept, that uses a yellow base with red details and logos.What do you think, Trojan fans?last_img read more