GAA NEWS: LETTERKENNY GAELS FACE NAOMH BRID IN CRUCIAL LEAGUE CLASH

first_imgLetterkenny Gaels GAA News:The Senior & Reserves are back in action this weekend when they travel to Naomh Brid on Saturday evening. See Facebook for throw in times.Our annual 5k road race & fun run is on next Tuesday 2nd June. This race is part of the Donegal Athletics Board Grand Prix Series. Please come out and support this fundraiser. Well done to Letterkenny Gaels club members from Illistrin National School who won the Best Sports Primary school for Hurling & Camogie.Nearly 40 of our U-8 & U-10 Hurlers & Camogs attended their first blitz of the season at Convoy on Sunday past.This Saturday the first U-8 football blitz of the season will take place at Pairc na nGael. Gweedore, McCool’s and Cloughaneely will be the other clubs attending. We hope to have a number of LK Gaels teams competing and for the first time ever we will have an U-8 all girls team playing. The blitz gets underway at 12 noon.The “Come hurl with me” programme is in full swing and being enjoyed by all who attend. This initiative is designed for Mums & Dads to learn and enjoy the skills of Camogie with their daughters.The programme will run every Friday evening for 6 weeks from 6.30-8pm. All welcome. Tickets for the upcoming USFC clash between Donegal v Armagh can be ordered by TEXTING Jim on 086 2271435.With the summer holidays fast approaching we have finalised dates for our Hurling Fun Week, Camogie Crew & Cúl Camp.The Hurling Fun week runs from 6th to 10th of July, Cúl Camp is from 27th to 31st July and the Camogie Crew is confirmed for the 22nd to 24th July.Any business interested in getting a pitch side ad should contact Dan on (086) 739 2780 for more details.Our U-12 football training continues on Monday & Friday evenings from 6.30-7.30pm at the pitch. New players welcome.Underage football coaching continues at 11am every Sunday at Pairc na nGael. New members welcome. Camogie training continues at the pitch on Mondays from 6-7pm for U-14 and older girls and Fridays from 6.30-8pm at the pitch for U-8, U-10 & U-12. Contact 086 8163605 for information. New players welcome. Please check club website and Gaels Camogie Facebook for more info.Hurling training continues at Pairc na nGael every Thursday evening from 6.30pm to 7.30 pm. Please contact Dan Harnett 0867392780 or Sharon Harnett 0868405785 to book or for more information. New members always welcome.For regular club updates and photos see our club web page, Facebook page or follow us on Twitter @LetterkennyGaelGAA NEWS: LETTERKENNY GAELS FACE NAOMH BRID IN CRUCIAL LEAGUE CLASH was last modified: May 26th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:GAALetterkenny GaelsNoticesSportlast_img read more

Regulating Rain Barrels Is Not the Best Idea

first_img RELATED ARTICLES Adell Amos is the Associate Dean for Academic affairs and Associate Professor of Environmental and Natural Resources Law at the University of Oregon. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. Throughout the United States, however, the law recognizes the public nature of water. Under the public trust doctrine, each state holds title to the water within the state in trust for the people of the state.Given the competing demands for water use, principles of U.S. law seek to balance these competing needs and uses to ensure that the public’s rights to water are protected.In the eastern United States, there is the riparian system that protects reasonable use of water among all landowners along rivers or streams. In the western part of the country, the doctrine of prior appropriation requires a permit to use water based on showing that the water will be put to beneficial use without waste.The public nature of water ensures that individual private interests never fully control who gets access to water and when, where and how water is used. In fact, when an individual has a right to use water, that right is known as a “usufructory” interest — that is, the right to use the water without owning the water itself.Granting a usufructory interest — something that doesn’t fully privatize a water right — makes good sense when you think about the nature of water.Short of putting water in a bottle and selling it by the ounce, water is difficult to possess and reduce to ownership. It is a shared resource that is used over and over again as the molecules of water make their way through the hydrologic system.Water falls from the sky, runs along the ground, and percolates into the groundwater system. It is taken up by plants and trees, consumed by people and animals, and eventually makes its way through one mechanism or another back into the groundwater or surface water sources, only to flow further down the system to be used again or eventually evaporate back into the atmosphere to start the process all over again.Private ownership of drops of water presents a complex problem, not only as a legal matter, but as an ethical public policy choice as well.The debate over rainwater collection demonstrates this complexity.Don’t homeowners in Colorado have the right to collect rain that falls on their rooftop? At the same time, doesn’t a senior water right holder have a right to have the rain enter the stream so that their right can be satisfied?Our legal system evolved ways to deal with this complex reality, with our state governments empowered to manage this resource among competing interests on behalf of all of us.In the eastern United States, where rainfall is plentiful and competing uses for water are rare, the riparian system allows any landowner adjacent to a water source to use its water. If there is a conflict about the quantity of water available for a certain use, that conflict is resolved by using legal standards to sort through the reasonableness of each individual’s use.In the western United States, where competition among users has always been more commonplace, each individual state requires a permit for water use. These permits are awarded pursuant to the doctrine of prior appropriation. For example, irrigated agriculture often holds senior water rights (issued under state law) and Indian tribes often hold even more senior rights (based on federal law).When conflict arises, disputes are resolved using the legal principle of first-in-time, first-in-right that protects the most senior, beneficial, non-wasteful uses of water. Or at least that is the theory. U.S. water law, east and westBoth the rainwater collectors and the existing water rights holders, such as irrigators or municipalities with water rights to river flows or groundwater sources, believe they have a fully private interest in any water they use. Many of us never think about who gets to use the drops of rain that fall from the sky. But it’s an increasingly pertinent question as more people look to collect rainwater as a way to conserve water, live off the grid, or save money on water bills.As a result, many states in the arid West are now asking whether rain barrels are allowed under existing law and policy and, in some cases, are setting limits on the practice of rainwater catchment.Colorado has gone further than any of its neighbors by requiring a permit for any rainwater collection. Meanwhile, Utah put rainwater harvesting rules into effect in 2010 with some restrictions, and Washington legalized rainwater collection in 2009, while leaving the state the “ability to restrict if there are negative effects on instream values or existing water rights.”Why this worry over rainwater harvesting?If everyone captures the rain that falls on rooftops and through downspouts of homes, the argument goes, then the water will never reach the rivers and streams. If this happens, existing water users may not be able to access their rights to use the water.This concern, however, overstates the issue and risks missing more concrete opportunities for water conservation and efficiency. A more effective way to address decreasing water supply would be for states to apply the legal principles prohibiting waste and demanding reasonable water use, which have long been embedded in any right to use water. In Colorado, Even the Rain Is Spoken ForCalifornia City Pushes Water ConservationDry Is the New NormalCalifornia’s Real Water CrisisSaving Water — Saving EnergyIn the West, Drought Ends ‘Era of the Lawn’The Uncertain Future of Phoenix and Las Vegas Water waste and powerful interestsSo how does this relate to the regulation of rainwater harvesting?If the primary concerns are that somehow rainwater barrels will limit the amount of water in the system, reduce availability of water, and potentially impact existing rights, then there may be better ways to address this concern.Rather than devoting resources to regulating individual rain barrels — a logistically difficult task — it may make more sense for state water agencies to get serious about enforcing principles of waste.To enforce waste reduction policies, water resource management agencies in each state would need to set standards on how much water is needed to carry out a particular use. They then would need to measure water use to ensure that individual permit holders are not taking more water than what is necessary to accomplish their purpose.Many longstanding water users take more water than they need, under the principle of use-it-or-lose-it. In western water law, if you don’t use the water, you risk forfeiting your water right. As a result, many users divert the full quantity of their water right whether that amount is needed or not.If the states crack down on waste, it will bring this longstanding practice into the spotlight. Existing water users may be faced with calls to increase efficiency and to decrease the rate of diversion.For decades, there has been a persistent reluctance to address waste because it would involve scrutinizing water use practices among some of the most powerful interests in the state.But by addressing the thorny problem of waste, state agencies could make more headway in securing reliable water supplies and certainly could have a more significant impact on water supply than regulating rainwater catchment.In the end, we may face tough public policy choices about whether and how to regulate rainwater catchment. But before we go in this direction, policymakers should take a careful look at whether existing larger-scale water users are complying with longstanding principles of non-waste and reasonableness embedded in U.S. water law.last_img read more

Vengeful boy posed as girl to kill elderly

first_imgMoments before his murder inside his home, 68-year-old D. K. Joshi was not inside his residence at Vasant Kunj.The retired government teacher was outside his house (probably strolling).He returned on seeing a ‘girl’ at the door pressing the calling bell.But as he came face to face with the person at the door, he soon realised it wasn’t a girl looking for him but a 17-year-old boy who lived in the building as a tenant till March this year. The boy was wearing a woman’s wig.The unusual sight didn’t probably bother him: why would his former tenant return after so many months sporting a woman’s wig? Joshi opened the door. An argument ensued as both of them stepped inside. The next moment, the boy stabbed him with a dagger. The Delhi Police on Tuesday arrested the 17- year- old for the murder.Joshi was killed on December 17 but the incident came to light on December 19. The police said the accused killed him in revenge. The deceased had earlier caught him stealing items from his house.Five police teams were hunting for the accused who was arrested within 48 hours of the incident.Police sources said an anonymous letter was found near the house of the victim naming the culprit. This helped the police zero in on the accused.The police found that two youth used to live as tenants in his apartment and had stolen money and jewellery from his house earlier this year. The accused and another boy lived with the old man from November 2009 to March this year.advertisementThe suspicion on the tenants proved right. ” After winning the trust of the old man, the accused had stolen cash and other valuable items along with the other boy. Joshi settled the matter out of court and the boy’s family paid him ` 3 lakh as compensation. But the boy remained remorseless and thought of eliminating the old man to settle the score,” deputy commissioner of police ( south) HGS Dhaliwal said.Joshi was seeking Rs 50,000 more from the family.The accused, preparing for the IIT entrance exam, was apprehended from the residence of his maternal uncle at E block in Gurgaon’s Sun City. He is from a well- off business family based in Singroli, Madhya Pradesh.For carrying out the murder, the accused arrived in the city on December 16 and stayed at his girlfriend’s place. She works in a beauty parlour in Kalkaji, the police said. He came with a dagger bought from Nepal in 2008.On the day of the murder, he borrowed a woman’s wig from the beauty parlour of his girlfriend and reached the old man’s residence along with a friend on a bike. He told his friend accompanying him that he had to meet someone who owes him money.” They parked the bike at some distance from Joshi’s residence.The accused asked his friend to wait for him. He then walked to the victim’s house wearing the female wig to avoid recognition,” Dhaliwal said.After killing the old man, the accused stole a laptop, a mobile phone and three wine bottles and fled from the backside. He stayed at his girlfriend’s place that night.From there he went to his uncle’s residence in Gurgaon.Surprisingly, the beat constable supposed to take the attendance of senior citizens every day did not know about the murder for two days. “The victim never wanted to get registered as a senior citizen as he was planning to relocate to America where his son worked.But our constable was still in touch with him,” Dhaliwal said.last_img

10 months ago’Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-players

first_img‘Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-playersby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery earned himself a bizarre nickname while managing at Almeria.The Spaniard helped Almeria to promotion to La Liga in 2007 before earning his first big move by joining Valencia a year later.According to Romaine Molina, the author of Unai Emery: El Maestro, the 47-year-old was known as a football nut by his players.”He is mad for football, he loves it,” Molina revealed.”His nickname when he was younger was ‘infermo de futbol,’ which means ‘sick for football’.”That is what one of his former players Laurent de Palmas used to say.”He told me that the players thought he breathed football, he sleeps football, maybe he even f***s football.”And he wasn’t laughing, he was serious while he was telling me.”Emery has had an instant impact since replacing Arsene Wenger in the summer. The Gunners are currently three points behind fourth-placed Chelsea. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammates

first_imgHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammatesby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan’s owners Elliott Management are seriously considering ending the loan of Gonzalo Higuain.Corriere della Sera says Higuain is losing the confidence of management and teammates as he struggles for goals.On-loan from Juventus, Higuain can be signed permanently for €36m. But Elliott are now fast losing confidence in the deal.There are also concerns about Higuain’s status amongst the squad, where the younger players believe he is enjoying preferential treatment.Indeed, when Patrick Cutrone was hooked during the stalemate with Bologna ahead of his senior teammate, he was caught complaining to teammates in the dugout, “Why me?” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoInter Milan boss Conte admits Lukaku and Brozovic clashed midweek

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Inter Milan boss Conte admits Lukaku and Brozovic clashed midweekby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveInter Milan boss Antonio Conte admits Romelu Lukaku and Marcelo Brozovic clashed in midweek.The pair scored in victory over AC Milan – just days after their clash at the end of their Champions League draw with Slavia Prague.Conte said: “Brozo and Lukaku are lovely lads and if anything, I get cross with them because they are too nice. They need to be more clinical on the field and not so naïve. If clashes happen, that’s welcome, because it means there’s blood in the veins and fire in there.“I’ve been a player, I’ve argued with teammates many times and then gone out to dinner with them afterwards. It’s not a big deal.” last_img read more

11 days agoArsenal star Lacazette: Guendouzi aims to become the best

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal star Lacazette: Guendouzi aims to become the bestby Freddie Taylor11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAlexandre Lacazette says Arsenal teammate Matteo Guendouzi wants to become the best. The 20-year-old midfielder was recently named as the Gunners’ Player of the Month for September.”He is like the younger brother [in the friendship group with me and Auba]!” Lacazette told Arsenal.com. “We all really have a good relationship, we like to work and to laugh together so it’s really good.”I’m really happy for Matteo [for being named September Player of the Month], he played really well, he helped the team when we needed him, he is really improving each season so we are all really happy with his performances this month. “We can see that every top midfielder in the world is like this [in terms of demanding the ball and being brave]. They all want to take the ball. “Matteo has a good ambition, he wants to be one of the best players in his position so every day he is trying to be the best and this month he showed that he can be.” last_img read more

Pushback in BC as Trans Mountain pipeline expansion hearings start

first_imgNational Energy Board hearings are set to start Monday in British Columbia on the detailed route of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion which would run through North Surrey, Coquitlam and Burnaby.The federal government approved the pipeline in November 2016 along a 150 metre corridor and the hearings will help determine the route within that corridor.But there is still a lot of local pushback.Municipalities and residents in Metro Vancouver are set to argue the proposed route would damage the environment and adversely impact homeowners.There have already been a number of protests and Mike Lloyd with NEWS 1130 in Vancouver said that will continue.“People setting up protest camps along some of these areas where the survey work has been done, some of the early survey work they’re doing before finalizing these routes and getting them through to the tank farms and the areas here in the coast,” he explained.Burnaby is a major opponent of the project and will present for three days during the hearings, but Lloyd said lines have been drawn within communities as well.“When you look at it a little more regionally, there is a lot of support for the expansion of the pipeline, but it certainly has been a contentious issue for many people still and that’s what we’ve seen with these protest camps,” he said.Spokeswoman Ali Hounsell said the company tried to route the new line along the old line where possible, but in some areas, urbanization made that difficult.She added they’re committed to replanting trees and minimizing the impact of construction on sensitive areas.The existing Trans Mountain line has carried oil from Alberta to B.C. since 1953.The hearings wrap January 31 before a second set of hearings is held in March.last_img read more

Boomer bikers are turning to threewheelers to keep up life in the

first_imgMONTREAL — Pam Fraser had never been on a motorcycle — or anything resembling one, such as the three-wheeled Piaggio scooter her husband Brian hauled home from the dealership 10 years ago.“I thought for sure he is going to kill himself on this thing,” she said.Brian, a firefighter at the time, relented, trading in the Piaggio a few months later. “The next thing you know he’s buying a Can-Am Spyder,” recalled Pam, 64. “Boys and their toys.”Brian, 66, who gave up biking as a young man, implored her to try the trike, made by Quebec-based BRP Inc. and resembling one of the company’s Ski-Doos on wheels — one in the back, two wide apart in the front.“So I put on my snowmobile helmet and popped on behind him and went for a little ride,” Pam said, her risk aversion honed by decades in personal insurance. “I was hooked.”The roadster has rerouted their retirement. Pam and Brian have put more than 250,000 kilometres on seven Spyders over the past decade. They’ve trekked to trike rallies in Missouri, Tennessee and North Carolina. Last July they rode to Deadwood, S.D., notching 1,000 kilometres a day.“I wouldn’t say it’s a hobby; it’s more of a lifestyle,” said Pam, who moderates the Ontario Spyder Ryders Facebook page, which counts more than 770 members. “It gives you a sense of freedom that you don’t have in a car.”The retirees from Orangeville, Ont., are part of a growing wave of baby boomers who are rediscovering life on the open road aboard the motorbike’s more stable cousin, the three-wheeled motorcycle. And manufacturers are scrambling to get on board, aiming to expand a mere industry sidecar into a major driver of sales while dodging licensing obstacles and derision from the hog elite.The number of three-wheeled vehicles registered in Quebec rose 60 per cent to 15,147 between 2014 and 2017, according to the Transport Ministry. Motorcycles grew 17 per cent to 185,416 in the same period.The rest of the country has been slower to adopt, but producers have their eyes on sunnier climes than Canada.Companies like BRP, Harley-Davidson Inc., Quebec-based Campagna Motors and Minnesota’s Polaris Industries are looking to expand in the U.S. as well as Australia, Japan and Europe.BRP chief executive Jose Boisjoli hopes to triple global sales of three-wheelers over five years to more than $1 billion — or nearly one-quarter of total company revenues in 2017 — driven largely by the newly released Ryker roadster. The sporty trike chops the Spyder’s starting price of US$17,000 to US$8,500 in a bid to attract younger and less wealthy riders.Ultimately, though, youth is not where it’s at. The average Spyder customer is 62, Boisjoli said.“To be honest, at the beginning we were saying we should attract younger people. But lately we’re saying, why? Retired people have disposable income. They have time,” he said.Enthusiasts say three-wheelers offer the exhilaration of a standard motorcycle but without the physical strain that comes with it.Still, some traditionalists remain resistant, even hostile, to three-wheelers, said Jeff Maguire, an account director with a Toronto-based ad agency that focuses on power sport products.“Most motorcyclists wave to each other,” he said. “I’ve noticed with Can-Ams, that doesn’t really happen. It’s not that they don’t wave, but they don’t get a wave back.”The sentiment may be “snobbish,” but having tried three-wheelers, he said he gets where it’s coming from.“It took all the things you get from riding a motorcycle — the freedom, the handling, the ability to lean into a corner — and sucked the fun out of it,” said Maguire, a third-generation biker who owns two Harleys and a 1972 Honda.On top of rider ridicule, licensing and regulations pose another hurdle. Some states, such as California, allow anyone with a driver’s licence to ride off the lot with a three-wheeler, though getting that licence can still be a deterrent.In Quebec, car drivers need only complete a special seven-hour course to drive a BRP roadster, which the company makes available at 17 driving schools in the province.Many states and several provinces and territories, however, require riders to enter a graduated motorcycle licensing system that amounts to a barrier to entry, he added.Ryan Blake, a motorcycle instructor at Learning Curves in Toronto, said three-wheeled motorcycles are partly an industry response to shifting tastes as riders look beyond big Harley cruisers for “old white guys” or roaring Japanese performance bikes.Products such as the Harley trike and Seattle-based Ural Motorcycles — famed for its sidecars — present a viable option to aging hog riders and disabled individuals, he said“In the old days, a lot of senior riders would get a sidecar to balance their vehicle — and put their dog in,” he said.“I have seen a lot of students with disabilities, guys who have artificial limbs…Their intentions are often to go and get a three-wheeled machine. It think it’s great, it’s fantastic.”Three-wheelers’ automatic transmission and stable handling can build confidence for consumers new to motorcycling as well as older riders returning from decades of self-imposed exile, Blake said.“‘As a real man, you ride two wheels, you don’t ride three.’ I think those stigmas are dropping today, I really do, because the technology is so fun to play with,” he said.“Back in the old days, you would never, ever see a group of Harley riders riding with sport bike riders. Now you see it everywhere. Everyone’s riding together.”Chris Reynolds, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

NCAER NIPFP to get funds from US eBay founders Omidyar Network

first_imgNew Delhi: Omidyar Network India Tuesday said it will provide Rs 16 crore (USD 2.3 million) grant to Brookings India, NCAER and NIPFP to conduct research on issues related to property rights in the country. The grant would be utilised to create a multi-organisation research consortium that will focus on issues linked to secure rights to assets, Omidyar Network said in a statement. The Rs 16-crore fund includes an innovation fund of Rs 3.5 crore (USD 500,000) to back proposals from across the country. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalBrookings India, National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) and National Institute of Public Finance Policy (NIPFP) would develop “evidence-based solutions to address chronic challenges in providing secure access to land, housing and property rights”. Omidyar Network India is part of a global network funded by the philanthropic capital of Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, and his wife Pam Omidyar. “The aim is to have these institutions, and hopefully other collaborators in the future, develop in-house expertise on important issues that are relevant for policy makers, build evidence around these issues and propose solutions that can truly improve the lives of people on the ground. said Shreya Deb, Director, Investments, at Omidyar Network India. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostNIPFP’s Professor Ila Patnaik said the consortium brings together many research institutions and experts and the knowledge it will generate will break new ground, and have a far-reaching impact. “I expect that the work we do as a whole will add up to more than the sum of the parts. And as the consortium grows, we will be growing India’s research capacity to deal with challenging land issues. Our own NCAER Land Policy Initiative will break new ground on gauging how the Indian states are doing on modernising their land records. said Shekhar Shah, Director-General, NCAER. Shamika Ravi, Director (Research) at Brookings India said well-defined and secure property rights are fundamental to the economic progress of a society. All participating institutions in the consortium will share their knowledge, as well as their networks and data sets, to enable more collaborative learning and research. Omidyar Network India makes equity investments in early stage enterprises and provide grants to non-profits in the areas of digital identity, education, emerging tech, financial inclusion, governance and citizen engagement, and property rights.last_img read more