Westbury Shooting Leaves Man Dead, Woman Critical

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 74-year-old man was shot dead and a 72-year-old woman was critically wounded by two gunshots in Westbury on Saturday night, Nassau County police said.Third Precinct police officers found the victims upon responding to a call reporting a person shot at a Waterbury Lane home at 9:40 p.m., police said.The female victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment of her injuries and is listed in critical condition. The man was pronounced dead at the scene. Their identities were not immediately released.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img read more

Homeowners could save thousands switching to better mortgages now

first_imgBased on Brisbane’s median house price of $550,000, owner occupiers with a $440,000 loan could make big savings of $4,494 a year switching to a better loan.Homeowners could save close to $4500 a year off their mortgages by shopping for a better loan deal now, new analysis found.Comparison site Finder insights manager Graham Cooke urged more Aussies to look into how to boost savings across multiple cost centres.“At a time when many households are feeling the financial pinch of COVID-19, we urge Aussies to see how their current loan stacks up,” he said. Don Algie cracks open his land piggybank According to Finder calculations, based on a loan size of $440,000, assuming 80 per cent LVR (based on Brisbane’s median house price of $550,000), the annual saving to be had switching to the best owner occupier variable home loan was $4,494 or $134,835 over 30 years.Finder said it arrived at the figures by reviewing the winner’s interest rate in the final quarter of the Finder Awards assessment period (12 months to May 2020) versus the current standard rates quoted by the big four banks.The winning three year fixed best owner occupier home loan saw calculated savings of $506 annually or $15,188 over three decades using that Brisbane data. The best variable investor (P & I) home loan savings were estimated at $4,124pa or $123,705/30years while that of the three year fixed for the investor category was $431pa or $12,942/30years.Mr Cooke said homeowners could also use apps to identify mortgage savings opportunities.“Once you connect your accounts to the (Finder) app, it analyses your spending behaviour, hunts down savings and sends you alerts when it could make financial sense for you to refinance.” LATEST QLD REAL ESTATE NEWS Auction set for epic Gold Coast mansion once listed for $45m “If you’re paying a higher interest rate or steeper fees, it could be time to switch and save.”He said there had never been a more important time to get a savings boost than now.“For an owner-occupier loan (variable), Aussies could save $4,494 per year or $134,835 over 30 years by switching to the best product on the market.”The comments came after the comparison firm’s 2020 awards named Freedom Lend its home loan category winner. Freedom Lend took out three categories in the Finder Awards including best owner occupier home loan – variable, best refinance home loan, and best investor home loan.Finder’s award for best owner occupier home loan – three year fixed was a product by Well Home Loans, while best investor home loan principal and interest three year fixed was awarded to Tic: Toc and best low deposit home loan (owner-occupier variable) was by P & N Bank & Home Loan. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours ago MORE: New weapon for property buyers Nuns sell Brisbane laundry for $27mlast_img read more

Speedy Poplawski adjusts to switch from attack to midfield for Orange

first_img Published on February 10, 2015 at 12:05 am Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Taylor Poplawski wasn’t always able to use her biggest strength.As a freshman last season, her quickness and agility helped her weave through defenders. She scored eight goals in her first three games and finished the year with the fourth-most goals on the team.But playing attack was limiting the space in which she could use her speed. Syracuse head coach Gary Gait saw her talents being underutilized and moved her to midfield for this year.After coming off the bench as an attack, Poplawski has transitioned back to the position she played in high school to join No. 3 Syracuse’s (2-0) second-line midfield. Although she’s able to use her speed in transition, she still has improvements to make on the defensive end.“(She) creates some more depth at the midfield for us,” Gait said. “I think she’s embraced the move, the positional change, and I think it’s really going to help our team be effective in all areas of the offense.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I think we can use her speed and athleticism in the midfield in riding, clearing. I think she’ll be looking at some north-south dodging in the midfield area.”At just 5 feet 2 inches, Poplawski is the smallest midfielder on the team, but the biggest challenge has been learning the defensive plays, she said. While learning what to do has been difficult, she said, the seniors on the team have been helping her out.Her first test this season came when Syracuse traveled to Florida to scrimmage Team USA in mid-January. The speed and intensity of the game were an adjustment from her high school days, Poplawski said. Gait said she played well, though, and didn’t make many mistakes.“The biggest challenge was keeping the intensity throughout the entire game,” Poplawski said. “Team USA, they’re so talented so it was really hard to keep up the energy, especially playing two back-to-back games against them.”In Syracuse’s game against Canisius on Saturday, Poplawski was able to show flashes of potential at midfield.On one play, she used her speed in open space to run past a defender and score. On the defensive end, she was able to recover from getting beat by stick-checking a Canisius attack from behind and knocking the ball loose.Though she had two points in the game, Poplawski held back the attacking instincts she developed last year and let newcomers Riley Donahue and Halle Majorana take over the scoring roles.“It’s a different team and a different offense and I think it’s just taking it one game at a time with this new team,” SU attack Kayla Treanor said.But at times, Poplawski’s growing pains as an adjusting midfielder at the collegiate level were evident.She stood flat-footed about 15 yards away from her own cage as Canisius midfielder Erica Evans ran past her toward the middle of the field. Poplawski struggled to catch up and Evans netted Canisius’ first goal of the game.A few minutes later, Canisius attack Lauren Smolensky cut past Poplawski toward the net and Poplawski had to illegally check her from behind as she tried to receive a pass.During some of SU’s rides, opponents were able to take Poplawski, who was guarding them, across the field and beat her down the sideline.After the game, she said her struggles could have been a result of fatigue.Still, Gait and Poplawski were happy with her performance and as the season progresses, Gait is looking for Poplawski to settle into the change.Said Poplawski: “More and more it feels more natural for me.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Iowa Legislature Still Debating Future of Traffic Enforcement Cameras

first_imgThe debate over traffic enforcement cameras has been revived at the Iowa capitol. Republican Representative Jarad Klein of Keota says a bill to completely ban cameras that generate tickets for speeding and red light violations is merely the starting point for this year’s discussion in the house.“Some of these cameras are definitely useful for safety. I recognize that,”Klein says, “but I also think there are a lot out there that are being used as a revenue-generating source and that is very problematic.” Klein is the designated point person on this issue in the House. He’s urging the companies that manage the cameras and the Iowa cities that use them to come forward with ideas for regulations on where the cameras may be located and how the ticket fines may be used.“I would rather not steamroll anybody, but we’re not beyond that either,” Klein said. “That is a way of encouraging everybody to participate in the conversation.” Gary Grant, a lobbyist for the City of Cedar Rapids, says speed cameras have been posted along Interstate-380’s “S-curve” in Cedar Rapids because it’s too dangerous for officers to pull motorists over there.“Mr. Chairman, we just want to say how appreciative we are that you come to this with an open mind and we’re looking forward to working with you,” Grant said. Des Moines Police Chief Dana Wingert says the cameras improve safety on the Des Moines freeway.“In 2018, in the half-mile stretch of I-235 where the cameras are located, eastbound where the cameras actually do enforcement, there were 13 accidents,” the chief says. “Westbound in that same stretch where there were no cameras and no enforcement there were 84 accidents.” Mike St. Clair represents GATSO (GAT-soh) U-S-A, the company that provides the traffic enforcement cameras in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids.“From a GATSO perspective overall, we would much prefer to have a regulatory framework so that we know where we stand in the state of Iowa,” St. Clair said, “as opposed to having the annual fight over whether there’s going to be a ban or not be a ban.” The first attempt to ban the cameras came in 2011, but a bill to do that has never cleared both the House and Senate.last_img read more

Summer Is Our Time At The Shore

first_imgBy Joseph Sapia Summer season crowds leave. Oppressive heat disappears, but it is still warm. The sun projects a softer light. Wildlife migrates. The foliage is changing colors.The magic of September at the Jersey Shore.“Don’t tell anybody,” laughed Cindy Zipf, executive director of the Clean Ocean Action.But, then, she added, “The secret’s out.”Secretly or not secretly, Shore people speak in wonder of September along the coast.“It is kind of magical,” said Margaret Mass, executive direc- tor of the Red Bank Visitors Center. “It’s a way to still enjoy the waterfront experience.“It’s kind of nice people can get into their favorite restaurants without a line,” Mass said. “It’s not too cold, not too hot.”Caitlin Over, 31, of Atlantic Highlands and Alissa Snell, 36, of Red Bank were leaving the Sea Bright beach, where both have season badges, on a recent day. While both are educators – Over, a guidance counselor at Howell High School and Snell, a school psychologist at Neptune High School – their summer is not over.September, Over said, “it’s my favorite local summer.”“The water’s warm, the beach is quiet, it’s just easy,” Snell said. “Everybody on the beach we know is a local.“It’s just more relaxed,” she added. “More people know their beach etiquette – don’t sit close to someone else, don’t blare music, throw garbage away, watch your kids.”Some wrongly think September is the end of beach season, said Olivia Rauso, 19, of Red Bank.“I think it’s really great, if you take adavantage of it,” said Rauso. “On Sandy Hook, it’s migrating season,” Dillingham said.Monarch butterflies and fall warblers are heading south, for example. “You start to notice that change,” Dillingham said.Zipf, whose Clean Ocean Action environmental group also is based at Sandy Hook, noted the changing of colors – the “bright yellow” of goldenrod and the ocean’s water, for example.“The water gets a reflection from the sun that’s deeper, crisper,” said Zipf, who has spent all of her 57 years at the Shore. “Foliage starts turning red. The air is crisper. It’s a beautiful time of year.”Pat MacMillan, 66, a recently retired Perth Amboy schools administrator who lives in Fair Haven, noted how September is a great time for town and beach.“We always try to get to the beach in September,” MacMillan said. “It’s quiet. You can go to the end of September. “You can go to restaurants, walk around without the crowds,” MacMillan said. “September is the best.”This September, MacMillan will do local trips to Ocean Grove and Island Beach State Park, along with vacationing at Acadia National Park on the Maine coast.Rauso, on the other hand, is headed back to school at Montclair State University. “As soon as I’m at Montclair, I miss the beach,” Rauso said. “It’s the best-kept secret, September at the beach,” Rauso said.But the secret is out….center_img For locals, September is sort of a Take Back the Shore.“You can look at it as our time,” said Laurie Potter of Rumson. “It can be a time to enjoy our own backyard.”But Potter, co-owner of River Road Books in Fair Haven, noted the “juxtaposition,” when the Jersey Shore’s traditional summer season of Memorial Day to Labor Day transitions with the coming of September.“You can go out to all the places you don’t want to get near in the summer,” Potter said.However, tourism also helps businesses, Potter said. And tourism takes advantage of September. For example, in Red Bank, the Guinness Oyster Festival is Sunday, Sept. 25, at the White Street Parking Lot.“We definitely enjoy a nice shoulder season, Red Bank being the gateway to the Shore area,” Mass said. “Temperatures go down, free beaches.“Beautiful weather,” Mass said. “We, sometime, have the nicest weather, September weather.”“It can be the best weather of the year, in September,” Potter agreed.“People feel it’s a good time to get out,” Mass said.The natural world, too, changes.“The way I always know it’s September is the gulls and terns wing dance,” said Tim Dillingham, executive director of the American Littoral Society, a Sandy Hook-based coastal conservation group. “They’re flying around, grabbing these (flying) ants.last_img read more

The Best Science Follows Design

first_imgSir Francis Bacon emphasized that you will know good science by its fruits. Here are good examples of fruitful research that took inspiration from nature’s designs.Chameleon SmartphonesCredit: Bernard Gagnon.Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colors (Science Daily). How do chameleons change colors? The answer: by shifting the spacing of nanocrystals on their skin. Can you think of any human technologies that need to do that? How about TVs and smartphones? Using this principle, researchers at Northwestern University first had to research how this is done in the lizards.“Chameleons can easily change their colors by controlling the spacing among the nanocrystals on their skin, which determines the color we observe,” said Teri W. Odom, Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Chemistry in Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. “This coloring based on surface structure is chemically stable and robust.“Good science led to good fruit. Using the same principle, “the Northwestern team’s laser exploits periodic arrays of metal nanoparticles on a stretchable, polymer matrix,” allowing them to change the emitted color at will. “The work could open the door for advances in flexible optical displays in smartphones and televisions, wearable photonic devices and ultra-sensitive sensors that measure strain.”Diatoms (Mark Armitage)Diatom NanotechnologySingle-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology (Science Daily). A quarter of the oxygen we breathe comes from “microscopic, jewel-like products of nature” called diatoms. You can find these microscopic jewels in oceans, lakes, rivers, and soils. Inspiration from their beautiful designs began in the 18th century. That led to curiosity, which led to good science. Researchers found out amazing things, all the way from their chemistry and microstructure to their ecological role for the whole biosphere.Through their respiration, they produce close to a quarter of the oxygen on earth, nearly as much as the world’s tropical forests. In addition to their ecological success across the planet, they have a number of remarkable properties. Diatoms live in glasslike homes of their own design, visible under magnification in an astonishing and aesthetically beautiful range of forms….Scientists have found that the silica architectures of diatoms are not only inspiringly elegant but exceptionally tough. Indeed, the silica exoskeletons enveloping diatoms have the highest specific strength of any biologically produced material, including bone, antlers, and teeth.The scientific discoveries, in turn, inspired good fruit. Wanting to mimic these properties, researchers in Arizona and Shanghai have “designed a range of diatom-like nanostructures.” This article uses the word “inspire” five times.Insect Wing DronesAn insect-inspired drone deforms upon impact (Science Daily). Drone owners understand the deep moan when watching their expensive toy crash. Insects seem to withstand impacts; what gives? The insect wing gives, that’s what. The origami-like structure in insect wings can fold and absorb blows. Japanese engineers put that kind of flexibility into joints in their insect-wing-inspired drones, and found that they survive much better. “This new type of drone, which was inspired by insect wings, draws on the advantages of both stiff and flexible structures.”Biological Light What is bioluminescence and how is it used by humans and in nature? (The Conversation). Cardiff University researcher Catrin Williams tells about some of the many organisms that generate light in nature. In her opening paragraphs, she pretends to know more than Darwin:Bioluminescence, the production and emission of light by living organisms, became a sticking point for Darwin. He struggled to explain why this phenomenon appeared in separate species in a seemingly random fashion. We now know, however, that bioluminescence has evolved independently at least 40 times on land and in the sea.Always be on the lookout when you hear a scientist say “we now know,” because you may be in for a bluffing exhibition. This one is a doozy. Rather than admitting the misfit with Darwin’s theory and the evidence, she leaps into belief in 40 evolutionary miracles! The facts that Williams shares need no help from Darwin.An embedded video shows how millions of “sea sparkle” plankton light up when disturbed by people throwing rocks into the sea or walking out into the water. Williams next tells how nature’s design has inspired imitations and uses all the way through human history, culminating in today’s “green energy” inventions and the green fluorescent protein from jellyfish that has revolutionized biomedicine and won its discoverers a Nobel Prize.Please don’t choke on Williams’ final sentence: “The evolutionary process that culminated in bioluminescence may have taken million of years, but its scientific applications continue to revolutionise our modern world,” she says, presumptuously assuming her hearers are Darwin DODOs, too. “Remember that, the next time you see the sea sparkle.” Wouldn’t you rather remember the Creator of these wonders? The Bible has much to say about light, starting from “Let there be light” as God’s first creative act, to Christ the Light of the World glorified in the light of the eternal heaven. In His light and works, we see the light in science. Good science takes inspiration from the Creator’s designs, and turns them into creative applications to show love to fellow humans. Remember, it was Jesus Christ who told the disciples that you would know good teachers by their fruits. That phrase is what inspired Francis Bacon to distinguish good science from bad. (Visited 395 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Exploring Standard Bank’s glass-fronted green building

first_imgStandard Bank’s new R2.5-billion building, completed in late 2013, has been given a five-star rating by the Green Building Council of South Africa.Standard Banks new ‘green’ building will house 5 000 of the bank’s staff. (Image: Standard Bank)Lucille DavieYou know you’re the most important person in the building when you’re the only one with a formal office, in an 11-storey, five-star-rated green building.The innovative environment-friendly new Standard Bank building on Baker Street in Rosebank, Johannesburg, is set for full occupation by 5 000 employees at the end of March. Its 65 000 square metres will have only one individual office, for bank chairman Ben Kruger. The rest of the building is entirely open plan, supplemented with dozens of meeting rooms and quiet nooks where staff can gather to discuss business.The R2.5-billion building, completed in late 2013, has been given a five-star rating by the Green Building Council of South Africa. The council is an independent, non-profit company formed in 2007 to lead the greening of South Africa’s built environment. Construction experts work with industry bodies, leaders, government departments and professionals to develop green solutions for the property industry. It is one of 92 members of the World Green Building Council.The council rates the sustainability of buildings according to four, five and six stars. Four stars are for “best practice”, five for “South African excellence”, and a six-star rating for “world leadership”. Standard Bank had targeted a four-star rating, so were pleased with the five stars the building received, says Rob Gravette, the head of project management at the bank.Open to the publicStandard Bank has created an attractive public dimension to the place – a green piazza the size of a rugby field open to the people of Rosebank, overlooked by the glass-fronted building. There it has planted 422 trees, all indigenous, as well as flower beds which by next summer will be bursting with blooms. In 2009 the bank cut down a number of established exotic trees on the site, including planes, pin oaks, palms, poplars, jacarandas, and the only indigenous tree, a white stinkwood, which caused a public outcry at the time.A green piazza the size of a rugby field open to the people of Rosebank (Image: Standard Bank)The public can enter the building from the piazza, and grab a meal at the ground floor restaurant. The foyer soars into the sky, with a set of escalators moving quietly up and down, offering views into the striking atrium with its huge hanging Marco Cianfanelli Africa-shaped sculpture, called The Seed, made of plywood stained with different earthy colours.The bank’s head office remains in the Johannesburg CBD, at the southern end of Simmonds Street, which houses 15 500 employees in 200 000 square metres. The dispersed business units have moved into the Rosebank building, although the eighth floor executive level is still to be occupied. This is where the chairman will find his desk.Sustainable constructionConstruction began in May 2010, and by mid-2013 the first bank employees started moving in. The finishing touches are still being applied, but it seems from the relaxed atmosphere inside that people are happy to be there, especially if they’ve come from the cavernous head office in the CBD.Massive triple-glazed glass walls go up 11 storeys, an area equivalent to 50 tennis courts, making optimal use of natural light and giving workers stunning views over the green trees and gardens of Rosebank.The building is in two parts: a nine-storey east wing and 11-storey west wing. And it ticks all the correct green boxes, of course. It has the usual dual-flush toilets, low-flow shower heads and tap aerators. Rainwater is harvested from the roof, reducing potable water demand by 56%. Water flowing into the basement – there are five levels of parking underground – is used for the gardens. There are bicycle lock-up slots for employees who cycle to work, with showers.An energy-saving gas-powered trigeneration plant, installed at a cost of R40-million, runs the building’s lighting, heating and cooling. “Standard Bank Rosebank’s trigeneration plant is South Africa’s second and, at a production capacity of one megawatt of energy, it will significantly reduce the building’s carbon footprint,” the bank said in a statement. There are also five generators, providing the building with full backup power, if needed.A cutting-edge digitally addressable lighting system, or Dali, has been installed in 99.26% of the building. This allows light fittings to be programmed according to use: lights automatically dim or switch off if an area is empty or receiving more sunlight. Lights near windows are dimmer than those towards the middle of the office, where less sunlight penetrates. Each light is linked to a computer, which tracks its performance. “Every light has an IP address,” says Gravette.One of the most impressive features is the windows’ triple-layered glazing, with a shading blind between the layers. The blinds automatically open and close as the outside light changes, taking the glare off surfaces inside the building. More than 65% of the exterior of the building is glass. The system took two and a half years for German experts to develop, says Gravette.Over 60% of the steel used in the building is recycled, while 50% of the timber has been sourced from Forest Stewardship Council certified suppliers. The council is an international not-for-profit organisation established in 1993 to promote responsible management of the world’s forests.At least 20% of the bulky materials used in the construction were sourced from within 400 kilometres of Rosebank, reducing carbon emissions in transporting the materials to the site.And, of course, throughout the building there are recycling bins for office consumables, and others for kitchen and restaurant waste.A studious atmosphereThe large offices themselves have a studious atmosphere, with stacks of white cabinets at the end of each long desk, labelled with the names of those sitting at the desk. Storerooms for files are discreetly tucked away, while air-con grids push out cool air at spaced intervals along the carpeted floor. Light streams in, wherever you sit.Each floor is colour coded, with communal work tables, café-style seating, armchairs and high-backed fabric seating, which is almost sound-proof, allowing for confidential discussions and alternative work spaces.“It’s different, and more relaxing,” says one employee, “I like the view and the office space allows for more interaction. I like to have people close.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Vengeful boy posed as girl to kill elderly

first_imgMoments before his murder inside his home, 68-year-old D. K. Joshi was not inside his residence at Vasant Kunj.The retired government teacher was outside his house (probably strolling).He returned on seeing a ‘girl’ at the door pressing the calling bell.But as he came face to face with the person at the door, he soon realised it wasn’t a girl looking for him but a 17-year-old boy who lived in the building as a tenant till March this year. The boy was wearing a woman’s wig.The unusual sight didn’t probably bother him: why would his former tenant return after so many months sporting a woman’s wig? Joshi opened the door. An argument ensued as both of them stepped inside. The next moment, the boy stabbed him with a dagger. The Delhi Police on Tuesday arrested the 17- year- old for the murder.Joshi was killed on December 17 but the incident came to light on December 19. The police said the accused killed him in revenge. The deceased had earlier caught him stealing items from his house.Five police teams were hunting for the accused who was arrested within 48 hours of the incident.Police sources said an anonymous letter was found near the house of the victim naming the culprit. This helped the police zero in on the accused.The police found that two youth used to live as tenants in his apartment and had stolen money and jewellery from his house earlier this year. The accused and another boy lived with the old man from November 2009 to March this year.advertisementThe suspicion on the tenants proved right. ” After winning the trust of the old man, the accused had stolen cash and other valuable items along with the other boy. Joshi settled the matter out of court and the boy’s family paid him ` 3 lakh as compensation. But the boy remained remorseless and thought of eliminating the old man to settle the score,” deputy commissioner of police ( south) HGS Dhaliwal said.Joshi was seeking Rs 50,000 more from the family.The accused, preparing for the IIT entrance exam, was apprehended from the residence of his maternal uncle at E block in Gurgaon’s Sun City. He is from a well- off business family based in Singroli, Madhya Pradesh.For carrying out the murder, the accused arrived in the city on December 16 and stayed at his girlfriend’s place. She works in a beauty parlour in Kalkaji, the police said. He came with a dagger bought from Nepal in 2008.On the day of the murder, he borrowed a woman’s wig from the beauty parlour of his girlfriend and reached the old man’s residence along with a friend on a bike. He told his friend accompanying him that he had to meet someone who owes him money.” They parked the bike at some distance from Joshi’s residence.The accused asked his friend to wait for him. He then walked to the victim’s house wearing the female wig to avoid recognition,” Dhaliwal said.After killing the old man, the accused stole a laptop, a mobile phone and three wine bottles and fled from the backside. He stayed at his girlfriend’s place that night.From there he went to his uncle’s residence in Gurgaon.Surprisingly, the beat constable supposed to take the attendance of senior citizens every day did not know about the murder for two days. “The victim never wanted to get registered as a senior citizen as he was planning to relocate to America where his son worked.But our constable was still in touch with him,” Dhaliwal said.last_img

This Yellow USC Concept Helmet Is A Pretty Interesting Design

first_imgA general view of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.LOS ANGELES – NOVEMBER 11: General view of action as the Oregon Ducks take on the USC Trojans on November 11, 2006 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The Trojans defeated the Ducks 35-10. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)When USC hits the field for the Holiday Bowl against Wisconsin on December 30, we expect the Trojans to wear their classic helmets. Going chrome with the current design is about the extend of what we see with alternate looks from the Trojans, but that doesn’t stop some of the internet’s top graphic designers from playing with some cool ideas for the program. Fresh Football Helmets and Deeyung Entertainment came up with a cool USC concept, that uses a yellow base with red details and logos.What do you think, Trojan fans?last_img read more

Husky Energy reports Q1 profit up lowers oil production due to Canadian

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Husky Energy Inc. reported a first-quarter profit of $248 million, up from $71 million a year ago, as it lowered its annual production guidance.The energy company says the profit amounted to 24 cents per share for the three months ended March 31, up from six cents per share a year ago.On an adjusted basis, Husky says it earned $245 million or 24 cents per share in the quarter, up from an adjusted profit of $73 million or seven cents per share in the same quarter last year. In its outlook, Husky says due to wide Canadian heavy oil differentials it will temporarily reduce heavy oil production and substitute discounted third-party crude as feedstock for its downstream operations. It also noted that its BD Project in Indonesia is ramping up more slowly than expected.As a result, the company is lowering its annual production guidance for 2018 by 10,000 barrel of oil equivalents per day and is now expected to average in the range of 310,000 to 320,000 boepd, exiting the year in the 330,000 to 340,000 boepd range.Husky says funds from operations for the year are still expected to be $4 billion.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more