Broward County Jail Inmate with Coronavirus Dies at Hospital

first_imgA Broward jail inmate who was being treated for coronavirus has died, officials announced Wednesday.The inmate was identified as 64-year-old Alan Pollock by the Broward Public Defender’s Office, which had been representing him.Records show that Pollock was a convicted sex offender who was jailed for a probation violation. He was jailed last month after being accused with changing his address without permission. Pollock was most recently held at the North Broward jail in Pompano Beach.“An inmate was being hospitalized and treated for COVID-19. He passed away yesterday evening,” sheriff’s spokeswoman Gerdy St. Louis said Wednesday. “His cause of death is pending investigation at this time.”Broward County’s jails, which house more than 3,000 inmates, have had at least five inmates test positive for COVID-19, according to the Sheriff’s Office.The Broward Sheriff’s Office says all new inmates are being screened for the virus before they are placed into the inmate population. Inmates are also being told to follow the guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for washing hands, refraining from touching their faces, and reporting symptoms immediately.Additionally, all in-person jail visitations have ended and have been substituted by video visitations.The Sheriff’s Office says Pollock showed no signs of having coronavirus when he was arrested in mid-March.On March 31, during a routine screening, he declined to take a medical test that was not tied to coronavirus.He was then moved from the jail’s infirmary to a hospital for evaluation and treatment. He tested positive for coronavirus at the hospital on April 1.The Broward Public Defenders’ Office says Pollock died at Northwest Medical Center on Tuesday afternoon.A March 19 court filing states that Public Defender Howard Finkelstein had tried to have him released from jail last month, citing coronavirus concerns.According to executive chief public defender Gordon Weekes, the motion for Pollock’s release was denied possibly due to his previous offenses.“We knew there was going to be a certain population that was going to be immune-compromised and vulnerable to contracting the virus,” Weekes says “We have to make sure these folks who have to remain in jail are being properly tested, properly distanced from other inmates and afforded appropriate medical care so they can survive exposure to this disease.”last_img read more

Martin County public schools to hold ‘traditional’ high school graduation ceremonies

first_imgPublic schools in Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties announced that they will be holding virtual graduations, while Martin County public schools announced they will postpone their traditional high school graduation ceremonies until late July.Superintendent Laurie Gaylord made the announcement on Thursday via a YouTube video.Gaylord said “The Martin County School District is committed to doing everything possible to celebrate the most significant senior milestone, graduation, in a way that honors your individual and collective accomplishments,”…”We are committed to providing you with the traditional ceremonies you have overwhelmingly asked for, earned, and deserve,”School district officials will seek input from public health experts about how to safely hold the ceremonies.last_img read more

Hilton and Baker hold their nerve to win U16 titles

first_img England regional squad players Charlie Hilton and Jess Baker came through nerve-tingling finishes to scoop the honours in the Midland U16 boys’ and girls’ championships at Hawkstone Park, Shropshire. For both players (pictured) it was their first big win – and both demonstrated how well they can cope with pressure. Hilton, from Ifield, Sussex, played the final three holes in one-under to force a play-off against Yorkshire’s Tom Osborne (Lindrick). He won the boys’ title on the first extra hole. Baker, from Gosforth Park Ladies, Northumberland, was one-under for the last nine holes, overtaking the long-time girls’ leader, Mia Eales-Smith (Lindrick), and winning by a single stroke.  Hilton, an England U16 international, was leading by two shots after 36 holes but after three holes of the final round he was three over and he dropped another shot on the seventh. “I just told myself to stay positive and keep going and I held it together well,” said the 16-year-old. He kick-started his round when he holed a confidence-boosting 9ft putt for birdie four on the 8th but, with three holes left, he knew he trailed Osborne by one. The 16th, a short par four, offered Hilton a chance to catch up – and he took it, playing his pitch to about 3ft and holing the birdie putt to draw level. Two pars at 17 and 18 gave him a 54-hole total of level par and took him into the play-off which he won with a par on the first hole. “It was good, I was really happy,” said Hilton, who now faces “revision, revision, revision” before taking his GCSE exams. Baker, meanwhile, trailed the girls’ leader by three with nine holes left to play. But the 14-year-old began her charge with birdies on 10 and 11, followed by a string of pars which took her into the lead and even allowed her the luxury of a last-hole bogey. Baker drew on the experience of last year’s English U14 girls’ championship when she was in contention, only to fall away and finish in a tie for seventh place. “I crumbled a bit under the pressure, but I’ve learned from that and I just went for pars. I didn’t try to do anything extraordinary, I just ground out a round,” she said. Both players have also been helped by their England Golf regional U16 squad training which helps the players deal with pressure situations. Hilton trains with the South East squad while Baker is in the North squad. Third place in the boys’ championship went to Dominic Clemons (Gog Magog, Cambridgeshire). Four players tied fourth: Ben Schmidt (Rotherham, Yorkshire), Remy Miller (Prestbury, Cheshire), Charlie Daughtrey (Rotherham, Yorkshire) and Tom Gregory (Stoke Park, BB&O). In the girls’ championship Mia Eales-Smith (Lindrick, Yorkshire) was runner-up; Harriet Barker (Carus Green, Cumbria) was third and Katie Sibley (Carlisle, Cumbria) was fourth. The team prize was won by Thames Valley regional squad represented by: Dominic Clemons, Conor Gough (Stoke Park, BB&O) Tom Gregory and Ben Pierleoni (Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire). The runners-up were Yorkshire, followed by the South East. Click here for the full results 21 Apr 2017 Hilton and Baker hold their nerve to win U16 titles last_img read more

Gill and Jones lead English challenge in Portgual

first_img Tags: Amateur, Mens, Portuguese 18 Feb 2018 Gill and Jones lead English challenge in Portgual England players, led by Bailey Gill and Ben Jones, put on an impressive performance in the Portuguese amateur men’s championship at the Montado golf resort, taking 10 of the top 20 places.Gill, from Lindrick, Yorkshire, and Jones, from Northamptonshire County, were joint runners-up alongside Denmark’s Sebastian Friedrichsen on 12-under par. The championship was won by Portugal’s Victor Lopes on 15-under.Gill birdied the last for a closing round of two-under 70, while Jones (pictured) charged up the leaderboard with his bogey-free 64.Three other English players completed top 10 finishes: Thomas Plumb (Sherborne, Dorset) was sixth on 10-under, after signing off with 66; Josh McMahon (Wallasey, Cheshire) was ninth on eight-under and Robin Williams (Peterborough Milton, Northamptonshire) was 10th on seven-under.Behind them were another five English players in the top 20: Conor Gough (Stoke Park, BB&O), Jason Stokes (La Moye, Jersey), Jake Bolton (Ogbourne Downs, Wiltshire), Harry Goddard (Hanbury Manor, Hertfordshire) and Tom Sloman (Taunton & Pickeridge, Somerset).Gill, Jones, McMahon and Sloman are members of the England Golf Men’s A Squad, while Williams and Goddard are in the Boys’ Squad.Image copyright Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more

Howard tops Hampton in ‘Battle of Real HU’

first_imgby Stephen D. RileyFor New Pittsburgh Courier (NNPA)—It’s been a season of ups and downs for the Howard Bison, who continue to make strides as the season winds down.Howard’s most recent high came as they trumped longtime rival Hampton 10-7, claiming their first victory in the rivalry since 1995. In the classic battle of the “Real HU,” Howard stole a road win at Hampton’s Armstrong Stadium to improve their Mid-Eastern Atlantic Conference (MEAC) record to 4-3, and even their overall record at 5-5.Freshman quarterback Greg McGhee from Perry High School in Pittsburgh passed for 132 yards, but his two-yard rush in the second quarter gave the Bison their lone touchdown of the day, enough to hold off the overconfident Pirates. Howard was able to control the game behind senior running back Terrence Leffall, whose career-high 42 carries and 131 rushing yards, kept the Bison offense steady on a cold afternoon.While Howard’s running game was dominant, their defense was even more impressive. Hampton’s only score came on a fumble recovery in the end zone in the third quarter. Howard’s defense forced two interceptions and held their opponent to just 16 rushing yards.The jubilance from snapping a 14-game losing streak allowed Howard’s players to douse first-year head coach Gary Harrell with a Gatorade bath on the sidelines after the game.It’s been a long time since the Bison were able to claim the title of the Real HU on the gridiron, and their win should ring bells on their city campus for the rest of the season.“We don’t get caught up in defending any title like that because in our opinion there’s only one HU and that’s Howard University,” Harrell told dailypress.com. “But no question this is a great win. We feel as though we’ve finally turned the corner.”last_img read more

Pitt, Penn State to meet in Big 10-ACC Challenge

first_imgPittsburgh head coach Jamie Dixon, left, talks with Talib Zanna ina game on Nov. 9, 2012 in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) — In-state rivals Penn State and Pittsburgh are facing off again — on the basketball court.The Pennsylvania programs will be pitted against each other in this year’s Big Ten-ACC Challenge. The Nittany Lions will visit the Panthers on Dec. 3.Penn State and Pitt last met in 2005, when the Panthers won 94-51 in Pittsburgh.Pitt, which is moving from the Big East to the ACC next season, leads the all-time series with Penn State 76-68.The schools are also renewing their longtime football rivalry for a four-year series starting in 2016.last_img read more

Tiger matches worst score in a major

first_imgARDMORE, Pa. (AP) — This isn’t the kind of record Tiger Woods had in mind at the U.S. Open.Woods went out-of-bounds on his second tee shot of the final round at Merion and closed with a 4-over 74. That gave him his worst 72-hole score as a pro in the U.S. Open, and it tied for his high score in any major.“I did a lot of things right,” Woods said. “Unfortunately, I did a few things wrong, as well.”Woods finished at 13-over 293.His previous high score in a U.S. Open was 290 at The Olympic Club in 1998 and Shinnecock Hills in 2004. Woods shot 294 at Oakland Hills in 1996 as an amateur.Just two days ago, Woods was four shots out of the lead and very much in the hunt to end his five-year drought in the majors. Then, he went 76-74 for his worst weekend in a major championship. Just over two weeks ago, the world’s No. 1 player had won three of his last four events on the PGA Tour and was starting to establish his dominance.But he looked ordinary at Merion.Starting the final round 10 shots behind, Woods made a birdie putt on the opening hole. Instead of a fist pump, he offered only a mild wave. Whatever hopes he had of at least getting his name on the leaderboard ended quickly. Woods pushed his tee shot to the right on the par-5 second hole, over the trees and out-of-bounds. His next tee shot was close to going out-of-bounds, stopping a few yards away in front of a tree. He wound up with a triple bogey.It was his only big number of the week, though his 20 bogeys were startling.“I struggled with the speed all week,” Woods said. “These greens are grainy. It’s one of the older bent grasses — creeping bent. I struggled with the speed, especially right around the hole. Putts were breaking a lot more. I gave it a little more break and then it would hang. That’s kind of the way it was this week.”The 293 matched his high score at any major, last year at the Masters when he tied for 40th.Woods did not mention any pain in his left elbow, though he kept that a mystery throughout the week. He was flexing and shaking his left hand on shots out of the rough early in the week, saying only that it was painful. He later revealed that he first hurt it at The Players Championship last month, which he won. But he didn’t mention the shot or even which round it happened.Merion remained a mystery for Woods throughout the week. For the first time since Olympic in 1998 — the year he was rebuilding his swing — he failed to break par in any of the four rounds at a U.S. Open.“It played tricky. The rough was up,” Woods said. “They were raking the rough up every morning into the grain, and the pins were really tough.”Woods plays again in two weeks at the AT&T National at Congressional, where he is the defending champion. His next major is the British Open at Muirfield, where in 2002 he was going for the calendar Grand Slam until he got caught in a vicious weather pattern of a cold, sideways rain and shot 81 to fall from contention. The final major of the year is at Oak Hill for the PGA Championship, where 10 years ago Woods never shot better than 72 and wound up at 12-over 292.“There’s always a lesson to be learned in every tournament, whether you win or lose,” Woods said. “I’ll look back at the things I did right and the things I did wrong.” Tiger Woods acknowledges the gallery after putting on the 18th hole during the third round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Tiger Woods hits down the 18th hole during the fourth round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Woods matches worst score in a majorlast_img read more

Pitt’s Donald named ACC Defensive Player of the Year

first_imgPittsburgh defensive lineman Aaron Donald (97) in action in an NCAA football game between Pittsburgh and North Carolina, Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)PITTSBURGH—Pitt senior defensive tackle Aaron Donald, the national leader in tackles for loss, has been selected the 2013 Atlantic Coast Conference Defensive Player of the Year by the Atlantic Coast Conference Sports Media Association (ACSMA).This is the latest honor for Donald, who earlier this week was named first team All-ACC by ACSMA. The Pittsburgh native is also a finalist for the Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Chuck Bednarik Award, Outland Trophy and Rotary Lombardi Award.Donald led the ACC Defensive Player of the Year balloting with 44 votes. Wake Forest nose guard Nikita Whitlock followed with 10, and Florida State cornerback Lamarcus Joyner placed third with eight votes. Boston College linebacker Kevin Pierre-Louis received two votes, while Florida State safety Terrence Brooks had one.“There are some great defensive players in the ACC, so to be selected for this award is a tremendous honor,” Donald said. “I would like to thank my Pitt coaches and teammates because they share in this award. I’d also like to thank ACSMA for recognizing not only me but also Pitt with this honor.”The 6-foot, 285-pound Donald is the Panthers’ first conference player of the year since 2010 when end Jabaal Sheard, now of the Cleveland Browns, was named the Big East’s top defensive player.One of the most disruptive players in the country, Donald leads the nation in tackles for loss (2.2 per game), while ranking 12th in forced fumbles (tied, 0.33 per game) and 16th in sacks (tied, 0.83 per game). Perhaps his most impressive statistic this season: of his 54 total tackles, nearly half have been behind the line of scrimmage (26.5).A graduate of Penn Hills High School, Donald has 28.5 sacks for his collegiate career, the second most among active players and the highest total by an interior lineman.Donald’s senior year production compares remarkably with former Nebraska defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, who swept the Lombardi, Outland, Bronko Nagurski and Bednarik awards in 2009 and was also a Heisman Trophy finalist.Through 12 games, Donald has 26.5 TFLs and 10 sacks. Suh had 20.5 TFLs and 12 sacks in 14 games.Aaron Donald (Courier Photo/William McBride/File)Donald will be attending three national awards functions next week.On Monday, Dec. 9, he will be in Charlotte, N.C., for the presentation of the Bronko Nagurski Trophy, presented to the nation’s most outstanding defensive player. Donald is one of five finalists for the honor, joining Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard, Florida State cornerback Lamarcus Joyner, Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley and Missouri defensive end Michael Sam.On Wednesday, Dec. 11, Donald will be in Houston, Texas, for the Rotary Lombardi Award banquet, which honors college football’s top lineman or linebacker. The other finalists are Mosley, Sam and UCLA linebacker Anthony Barr.On Thursday, Dec. 12, Donald will attend ESPN’s The Home Depot College Football Awards telecast from the Dance Hall on the Disney Boardwalk in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Donald is a finalist for two awards that will be presented on the show (which airs from 7 to 9 p.m.): the Chuck Bednarik Award, given to the college defensive player of the year, and Outland Trophy, given to the nation’s best offensive or defensive interior lineman.Donald is one of three finalists for each award. The other Bednarik finalists are Barr and Mosley. Donald’s competition for the Outland Trophy includes Texas A&M senior offensive tackle Jake Matthews and Baylor senior offensive guard Cyril Richardson.last_img read more

Concussions a greater problem for Black youth

first_imgPresident Barack Obama speaks in the East Room at the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 29, 2014, during the White House Healthy Kids and Safe Sports Concussion Summit. Obama was hosting a summit with representatives of professional sports leagues, coaches, parents, young athletes, researchers and others to call attention to the issue of youth sports concussions. Pictured from left to right: LaVar Arrington, former NFL linebacker; Victoria Bellucci, a high school soccer player from Huntingtown, Md.; Taylor Twellman, former professional soccer player; Gen. Ray Odierno, Chief of Staff of the United States Army. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) WASHINGTON (NNPA) – Despite the flurry of news about NFL lawsuits over concussions, the problem affects far more athletes at the high school and junior high school level, according to the federal government statistics.In 2009 alone, nearly 250,000 youth age 19 or younger were treated in emergency rooms for sports and recreation-related injuries that included concussions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Between 2001 and 2009, the rate of such visits rose 57 percent.Concussions occur when the brain is shaken violently against the skull. Although concussions are the most common brain injury, widespread awareness and concern about this issue in the world of student athletics is fairly recent.But it is especially relevant for Black communities, particularly young men most likely to die from traumatic brain injuries, according to the CDC. And according to data from research nonprofit, Child Trends, 50 to 60 percent of Black American high schoolers were on a sports team in 2011.In severe or untreated cases, they can cause brain damage, seizures, emotional distress, and death—in fact the CDC estimates that 5.3 million U.S. citizens are living with disability as a result of a traumatic brain injury (or TBI, an umbrella term that includes concussions).“From an athletic trainer perspective concussions have always been a big concern. Coaches seemed to think that injuries increased because [athletic trainers] were there, but really it’s that awareness is increased,” says Jennifer Rheeling, a veteran athletic trainer in D.C. Public Schools and chair of the Sports Medicine Advisory Committee for the D.C. State Athletic Association.“In the last five years particularly with the NFL starting to talk about it, and the lawsuits, has helped immensely now that people get it on a mainstream level. What they thought was just getting their bell rung was really a concussion.”On the most diligent and well-resourced student teams, players take baseline tests—a battery of motor skill drills and survey questions to record their individual peak cognitive health—and have athletic trainers who check for signs of decline. If a concussion is suspected, a player does another test to compare those results to his or her baseline. The ImPACT Concussion Management program is currently the program of record for these tests among school athletic programs.But according to Dr. Vernon Williams, neurologist and medical director of the Sports Concussion Institute, a lack of access to care compounds the (now fading) problem of awareness. ImPACT, for example, costs a minimum of $400 per year for 100 baseline tests and 15 post-injury tests for one school. Meanwhile, many schools and school districts, largely populated by Black and brown children, routinely have to make cuts to balance their budget.“We have coaches who understand the need, but they have different resources. For example, we know baseline testing for people in contact collision sports can help evaluate when people get injured,” Dr. Williams explains. “But it’s uncommon for people to have access to state-of-the-art baseline testing. Players, school systems, and parents don’t have access to those funds. But we can still implement treatment using creative measures.”Currently, Dr. Gary Harris, who specializes in computer engineering and serves as associate provost for Research and Graduate Studies at Howard University, is working with engineering students and the Bison football team to devise an inexpensive concussion monitoring system, using an open source platform.(“Open source” is a tech industry term that means the equipment and information to create this system is public as opposed to proprietary, so as to encourage others to innovate and improve on the idea).The project uses a computer chip attached inside the helmet that measures impact up to 100 gs of force. For reference: a sneeze is about 2 or 3 gs of force on the human body; an F-16 fighter jet barrel roll exerts 7 to 9 gs; a car crash at 45 mph is about 60 gs. Concussions usually happen with collisions between 80 and 120 gs.The chip records the force of impact for every collision—it can be programed to transmit this information wirelessly, say, to a cell phone app. Or, it can be downloaded from the helmet using a USB cable. It can also be programed to send an alert when a hit exceeds a certain threshold.“You can have an entire team’s list where you know all their shock, trauma, and incidents on file,” says Dr. Harris. “We still don’t know the threshold of force for brain damage, we don’t know how many hits it takes, but the first thing we have to do is collect the data.”Each of these chips costs approximately $30.Technology is also being used to improve care and outcomes the aftermath of serious concussion cases. Interactive Metronome, a health tech company that creates neurological research-based brain training programs and activities, is one example. The activities are designed around “brain timing”—the ability to clap to a beat, for example. As users play games and do activities that test their reaction time, those brain cell connections are repaired and strengthened. Originally (and primarily) used to improve motor skills and cognitive function in children with ADD/ADHD, the program is beginning to see success with TBI rehabilitation.“We fit into concussions in a new way, which is helping out when those [post-concussion] symptoms don’t dissipate,” says Nick Etten, vice president of Strategy and Business Development at Interactive Metronome. “There’s a lot of emphasis on technology these days—it’s really important in the world of concussions and cognitive rehab. We’re starting to understand that there was a big void in information.”Technology has helped improve identifying and treating concussions; on the prevention front, sports health care professionals now have the backing of the law. In all 50 states, a student athlete must be immediately removed from play if a concussion is suspected, and cannot return to practice or play without medical clearance. Some states also mandate that a student must remain free of symptoms or remain on the injured list for a set period of time, even if they gain medical clearance immediately.But there are still holes in preventing these injuries.“There’s clearly benefits to legislation in terms of drawing attention to the issue of concussions and having some foundation across the board with how they should be managed,” says Dr. Williams. “I think there are some variables…related to who should be allowed to clear players.”He and Rheeling have both seen athletes on under-resourced teams get clearance from an emergency room resident, for example, in contrast with athletes who take a concussion test against their baseline with their team’s athletic trainer. They’ve also seen instances of students underreporting their symptoms, coaches resisting care recommendations, and parents being lax in monitoring their child’s rest after a concussion.Emerging laws are attempting to add another layer of protection by regulating the number of weekly practices involving rough contact drills, thus reducing exposure to collisions and risk of concussion. Trainers, coaches, parents, and athletes can also receive guidance through resources such as the American Academy of Neurology online Sports Concussion Toolkit, and organizations such as the Sports Legacy Network.“We’re at the end of the beginning as relates to concussion management. We’re learning more every day and the process will continue to evolve,” says Dr. Williams. “We’re out of the phase of explaining what a concussion is, identifying symptoms…. It’s no longer an unrecognized epidemic, we’re aware of the issues and that [a concussion] has to be managed effectively.”last_img read more

2013 Thurston County Fair Exhibitor’s Guide Now Online

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Thurston County Fair OfficeExhibitor’s Guide for 2013 Thurston County Fair Now OnlineAnimal entries due by Monday, July 1Whether your specialty is food, crafts, animals or art, the 2013 Thurston County Fair has an exhibit or contest you’re sure to love. The 2013 Fair Exhibitor’s Guide is now available online with over 60 pages filled with information and contest rules.All of the information and details you need to compete in hundreds of open class and club contests are included in the guide, plus information on entry forms, camping, and this year’s calendar of events from July 31 through August 4. Download the complete 2013 Exhibitor’s Guide here.New in 2013 is an open class llama competition. Entries for the open class llama competition and all animals for the 2013 fair contests are due on Monday, July 1.  All FFA members and open class entries must be turned in to the Fair Office by 5 p.m. on Monday, July 1, and all 4-H animal participants must submit their entry forms by 6 p.m. to the 4-H Extension Office located on the Thurston County Fairgrounds. Many entry forms are available at the Fair Office or online at www.co.thurston.wa.us/fair/documents/forms.htm. Members of FFA and 4-H should contact their local club for more information on animal entries.If the laughter and ladybugs in this year’s contests and exhibits don’t tickle your fancy, there are plenty of volunteer opportunities that will keep you giggling and having fun at this year’s fair. Contact the Thurston County Fair Office for more information about volunteering for this year’s fair.For more information on the 2013 Thurston County Fair Exhibitor’s Guide, contest entry forms, volunteer opportunities, or other fair activities, contact the Thurston County Fair Office at (360) 786-5453 or visit our website.“Laughter and Ladybugs at the Thurston County Fair!”    July 31 – Aug. 4, 2013last_img read more