Police talk about Newman case and more says they need more information

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, June 26, 2017 – Providenciales – Police say the men featured on four wanted posters dispatched to media and the general public following the shooting of an American tourist on Friday are not necessarily linked to the crime.Acting Commissioner of Police Trevor Botting, stated that “the tentative shooting of Mr. Newman is nothing to directly link those people to that specific crime. They are wanted, as you can see from the wanted posters, for a number of offenses but we’re keeping a very open mind as to which they may be ultimately responsible for.”The men are just wanted for the litany of crimes listed on the posters, and while they may be linked to the shooting of Kevin Newman of Alabama, who is now in serious but stable condition at a Florida hospital, there is no evidence as yet linking them to the serious attack. Magnetic Media had a one on one with Acting Police Commissioner, Trevor Botting today who also revealed that TCI Police still need to interview Mr. Newman who was in no shape to give information in the case before he was airlifted to Broward Health.“And certainly when Mr. Newman is fit, medically fit- his recovery is a priority for us a the moment -but as soon as he is, we will look to speak to him and we’ll be doing that personally at some point in the future.” he added.Police say they remain in touch with the family and that residents need not feel as if this crime is more important than community cases nor do they need to feel as if police are not doing their best to find who is responsible.“We’re not getting as much as I would like and that’s not to say we haven’t had any already but you obviously don’t know the details of that. But please please just tell us anything, even if you think we know already.”Police are getting some information, but Acting Commissioner Botting told us he could do with more information directed to his investigators. As for how this case is classified… Mr. Botting said, “The actual face of the case will depend on the investigation. So this morning’s press release, I spoke to a serious assault, cause that’s actually what it is. Whether it’s an attempted murder, whether it be a manslaughter, that classification really comes towards the end of the investigation when we have more information about what actually occurred.” ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

VW might take deposits for the ID electric hatch in Europe

first_img More From Roadshow 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 75 Photos Share your voice Electric Cars Future Cars Hatchbacks 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Tags Preview • 2019 Audi E-Tron: A worry-free, all-EV SUV 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tesla Volkswagen News • 2019 Audi E-Tron SUV range and on-sale date released Comment 1 Volkswagen’s ID concept is the start of VW’s electric revolution More about 2019 Audi E-Tron Electric cars: Juice up with all the EV news we’ve got.VW I.D. Buzz: We’ve already driven the future. The first of VW’s I.D. electric cars in Europe will be the Golf-ish-sized hatchback, and there have been more than a few comparisons to Tesla there. Now, VW looks to implement a preorder deposit system that also seems a little familiar.Volkswagen might allow interested parties to place a deposit for the upcoming I.D. hatchback, Automotive News Europe reports, citing an interview with VW brand chief Juergen Stackmann. The deposits will help determine who is ready to make a “serious commitment,” and while Stackmann told ANE it wouldn’t be a large amount of money, it’ll be big enough to attract serious buyers.According to ANE’s report, VW has already floated the idea of a deposit system in test markets, and apparently, customers in EV-friendly European countries are more than willing to try and get an early crack at the first in an onslaught of MEB-platform electric vehicles. Obviously, those putting down deposits would then get priority when the cars start leaving the assembly line, which in the case of the I.D. hatchback should happen in early 2020.Enlarge ImageThe hatchback is already being tested in camouflage, so a proper debut shouldn’t be too far away, especially since its market launch is slated for early 2020. Volkswagen “We have tested it several times in Norway and the customers want it. It’s surprising but people in Norway and Holland want to be a part of it. Germany is definitely not the pacemaker in Europe,” Stackmann said to ANE.The I.D. will be the first of VW’s new electric cars in Europe. It’s about the same size as a Golf, and it’s expected to cost about as much as a fully loaded diesel model, which comes out to between $35,000 and $40,000 in the US. In the US, we’ll get the I.D. Crozz SUV as the first car in 2020, with the I.D. Buzz microbus following in 2022. Tesla first brought the idea of preordering a popular car to prominence with its Model 3 sedan. As ANE notes, critics believed it served the second purpose of helping Tesla stack its coffers as it expanded its manufacturing efforts. Nevertheless, the refundable deposits took off and Tesla ended up sitting on hundreds of thousands of them. VW’s car may not have the Model 3’s cult of personality, but it’ll be interesting to see just how many orders VW can drum up before the car heads to production.last_img read more

Pope to preach unity to North Macedonia

first_imgPope Francis (L) is welcomed by Macedonia`s president Gjorge Ivanov during a welcome ceremony in the courtyard of the presidential palace in Skopje on 7 May. Photo: AFPYellow billboards and buses with Pope Francis’s smiling face welcomed the pontiff as he landed in North Macedonia on Tuesday, in a visit delighting a small country whose capital is the proud birthplace of Mother Teresa.Pope Francis was received by the country’s president and prime minister on the airport’s tarmac, where he was offered bread and salt in a traditional greeting of hospitality.Catholics make up only a small sliver — less than one percent — of the country of 2.1 million, which is a patchwork of faiths and ethnicities.Like Bulgaria, the pope’s first stop on his three-day Balkan tour, North Macedonia is mainly Orthodox Christian, a church Francis is keen to improve relations with.But the country is also home to a large community of ethnic Albanian Muslims, who make up to a quarter of the population.People of all faiths have been scooping up the 15,000 tickets to attend the Pope’s mass in Skopje’s main square, which will be held just down the street from where Mother Teresa was baptised in 1910.It is not every day that the country gets to host a global celebrity.”Many of my friends are going, a lot of people want a selfie with the pope you know,” 25-year-old Stefanija Veselovska, who is Orthodox Christian, said with a smile.”Young people love the pope, no matter what their background is,” she added.Abedin Arajdini, a 26-year-old Albanian from a Muslim family, also has a ticket.”I really want to see this guy,” he told AFP, adding that he is inspired by how Francis “talks about poverty among young generations”.Landlocked North Macedonia is one of Europe’s poorest countries.Average wages are around 400 euros ($450) a month, while more than a third of young people are unemployed.Political dividesAhead of his visit, Francis praised the mix of cultures, religions and ethnicities in a country that sits at the crossroads of the East and West.He said he was coming to “sow these seeds” of solidarity.”Living together is not always easy, we know that,” he said in a video message.”But it’s worth struggling toward, because the most beautiful mosaics are the ones that are richest in colours.”Catholics from neighbouring countries like Croatia and Albania are also making the pilgrimage to see the mass.The pope’s unity message may also be an effort to soothe North Macedonia’s sharp political divides.The rancour has been festering over the centre-left government’s deal to officially change the country’s name from Macedonia to North Macedonia.The move ended a decades-old row with neighbouring Greece and helped clear Skopje’s path to join NATO and the European Union.But it upset critics who felt a piece of their national identity had been unjustly robbed.Ahead of Francis’ arrival, prime minister Zoran Zaev, a devout Orthodox believer, said the pope was “coming to the hometown of Holy Mother Teresa… who carries a special symbol of reconciliation and solidarity”.North Macedonia’s Catholic bishop, Kiro Stojanov, also called the pope’s visit a “strong impetus” for the country to continue “democratising society” and promote justice and equality.Daughter of your landBefore his mass on the one-day stop, Francis will address Zaev and president Gjorge Ivanov.Then he will meet with the poor and religious leaders at a memorial dedicated to Mother Teresa, who was born to an Albanian family in Skopje when the city was part of the Ottoman empire.She later left for Calcutta where her work with the poor saw her canonised as a saint by Pope Francis in 2016.Her legacy is visible in her birthplace in the form of statues, memorials and a highway christened in her name.Pope Francis said he “entrusted” his visit to the “great saint, daughter of your land”.”Through the grace of God, she became a courageous missionary of Christ’s charity in the world, giving comfort and dignity to the poorest of the poor,” he said.last_img

Printable Flexible CarbonNanotube Transistors

first_img Applications for these flexible electronics include electronic paper, RFID (radio frequency identification) tags to track goods and people, and “smart skins,” which are materials and coatings containing electronic circuitry that can indicate changes in temperature or pressure, such as on aircraft or other objects.Printing circuits onto plastic is not a new achievement. Researchers have created printed circuits at room temperature using various semi-conducting polymers as the carrier transport medium, and many, many research groups across the globe continue to work toward perfecting the process and product.“A problem with these polymers is that they have limited carrier mobility, meaning electrons travel through them fairly slowly. This limits the speed of the devices made from them to only a few kilohertz,” said UMass Lowell Professor Xuejun Lu, the study’s corresponding researcher, to PhysOrg.com.Modern computers, by comparison, have speeds from hundreds of megahertz to more than one gigahertz.As part of the printed-electronics effort, carbon nanotubes have been investigated as a medium for high-speed transistors, with very promising results. But one method of depositing the nanotubes onto the plastic, “growing” them with heat, requires very high temperatures, typically around 900°C, which is a major obstacle for fabricating electronic devices.Additionally, transistors made from single carbon nanotubes or low-density nanotube films, which are produced by depositing a small amount of a nanotube solution onto a substrate, can carry only a small amount of current. High-density films (more than than 1,000 nanotubes per square micrometer, or millionth of a meter) are better, but most are not of sufficient quality, containing carbon “soot” that covers the nanotubes’ sidewalls and hinders carrier flow.To help solve these issues, Brewer Science, Inc. developed an electronic-grade carbon-nanotube solution. The researchers deposited a tiny droplet of the solution onto a plastic transparency film at room temperature using a syringe, a method similar to ink-jet printing.“Our electronic-grade solutions contain ultrapure carbon nanotubes without using any surfactant. Our printed transistor’s carrier mobility is much higher than similar devices developed by other groups, it exhibits a speed of 312 megahertz, and can carry a large current,” said Dr. Xuliang Han, Senior Research Engineer at Brewer Science. This research is described in the November 16, 2007, online edition of Micro & Nano Letters.Citation: Micro & Nano Letters — December 2007 — Volume 2, Issue 4, p. 96-98Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Brewer Science, Inc. have used carbon nanotubes as the basis for a high-speed thin-film transistors printed onto sheets of flexible plastic. Their method may allow large-area electronic circuits to be printed onto almost any flexible substrate at low cost and in mass quantities. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furthercenter_img Pantry ingredients can help grow carbon nanotubes Citation: Printable, Flexible Carbon-Nanotube Transistors (2008, January 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-01-printable-flexible-carbon-nanotube-transistors.htmllast_img read more

Out of Africa date brought forward

first_imgÖtzi the Iceman, a well-preserved natural mummy of a Chalcolithic (Copper Age), who was found in 1991 in the Schnalstal glacier in the Ötztal Alps. Credit: South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology (Phys.org) —A study on human mitochondrial DNA has led to a new estimate of the time at which humans first began to migrate out of Africa, which was much later than previously thought. Triple burial from Dolni Vestonice in the Czech Republic. Credit: J. Svoboda Explore further The new study sequenced mitochondrial DNA from fossils of ancient modern humans rather than living humans. The fossils were dated using radiocarbon dating methods. Since the samples were from humans who lived up to 40,000 years ago, mutations that have occurred in the genome since they died would be missing, and the samples provided a range of calibration points for their estimation of the start of the migration.The disagreement in dating the migration between the new study and previous genetic research could be due to underestimating the number of new mutations in a generation of living humans because of the difficulty of discriminating between true mutations and mistaken ones and because of a desire to avoid false positives. Under-counting would lead to an older estimate for the migration from Africa and other important events.The new date, which agrees with the archaeological evidence, shows that modern humans were in Europe and Asia before and after the most recent glaciation, and they were therefore able to survive and adapt to a dramatically changing climate.The paper was published in the journal Current Biology on 21st March. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New ancestor? Scientists ponder DNA from Siberiacenter_img The new study by an International group of evolutionary geneticists used mitochondrial DNA from the remains of ancient modern humans to estimate the rate of genetic mutations. Three of the skeletons were from the Czech Republic and dated at 31,000 years old, two were 14,000 years old, from Oberkassel, Germany. Another sample used was the natural mummy Ötzi the Iceman, who lived some time between 3350 and 3100 BC. The most recent skeleton was that of a man who lived in medieval France 700 years ago, while the oldest was dated at 40,000 years ago, and came from Tianyuan in China.The results suggest that the genetic divergence between African and non-African humans began between 62 and 95 thousand years ago, which tallies with other studies estimating the time through dating of stone tools and fossils, but they disagree with the results of recent genetic studies that estimated the migration began much earlier, up to 130 thousand years ago or even before.The previous studies sequenced the entire genome of living humans to count the number of genetic mutations (around 50) in newborn babies compared to the parents to determine the generational mutation rate. This then provided the a molecular “clock,” which could be extrapolated backwards to date important events in human evolution. Journal information: Current Biology © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Out of Africa date brought forward (2013, March 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-africa-date-brought.html More information: A Revised Timescale for Human Evolution Based on Ancient Mitochondrial Genomes, Current Biology, 21 March 2013, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.02.044 www.cell.com/current-biology/r … ii/S0960982213002157last_img read more