QPR ‘aim to beat Everton and Sunderland to Rovers star’

first_imgQPR boss Mark Hughes plans to pip Cardiff City to the signing of Liverpool striker Craig Bellamy, the South Wales Echo believe.Cardiff are keen to take the Wales international back to the club where he had a loan spell, but it is suggested that Hughes is also interested in signing him.Linked with move for Bellamy.Hughes’ imminent signing of Park Ji-sung from Manchester United is among the headlines, with the Daily Mail suggesting Rangers have offered £5m for the Korean.Related West London Sport story: Korean star Park set to join QPR from UnitedQPR hope to beat off competition from Everton and Sunderland to capture winger Junior Hoilett from Blackburn, the Daily Mirror say.Former Rovers boss Hughes has been interested in signing Hoilett for some time.And it is claimed that he has offered more money than Everton, who are also keen on the Canadian.Hoilett is out-of-contract and plans to leave Ewood Park this summer. At 22, he is too young to move on a Bosman free transfer, so Blackburn will be due compensation unless they accept an offer.Sunderland and German club Borussia Monchengladbach are also said to be interested.Meanwhile, Wigan supremo Dave Whelan has warned Chelsea he will not cut his £10m asking price for Victor Moses, the Mail report.Chelsea are expected to bid about £7m with add-ons over the weekend. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Can We Just Pretend Morality Is Real?

first_imgA survey experiment showed that people who believe morals are like facts are more charitable than those who consider morals mere subjective opinions.In “‘Moral Realism’ May Lead to Better Moral Behavior,” Science Daily reported on a survey by Liane Young, assistant professor of psychology at Boston College.  Her survey team went out seeking donations for charity.  Before requesting money, the canvassers asked a leading question that “primed” the respondent to consider whether morality involves objective facts or mere cultural opinions.  The ones primed with “moral realism” gave more money.  Young got similar results with an online survey.  Control groups were not “primed” with the leading questions.Since “real” moral stakes may be accompanied by “real” consequences — whether good (e.g., helping others, enhanced self-esteem) or bad (e.g., retribution), priming a belief in moral realism may in fact prompt people to behave better, in line with their existing moral beliefs, the researchers say.This conclusion makes no judgment about moral realism or anti-realism.  It just states what works.This is a modern form of behaviorism: an amoral, godless psychological theory that denies the reality of mental states, and just observes outward behaviors.  Behaviorists seek to find what kinds of manipulative actions produce predictable behaviors.  But who decides what behavior is “better” without unchanging standards?  In the wrong hands, this kind of information could lead unscrupulous leaders to manipulate people for the leader’s own purposes.Either morality is real, like unchangeable facts, or it evolves.  If it evolves, what is considered evil today could become “good” in another time and culture.  Unless there are moral absolutes, therefore, there are no morals at all.  We need to promote “moral realism” not just because it produces someone’s opinion of desirable results, but because it is true. (Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Hackers For National Security Taking ‘Friendly’ Fire

first_imgGrowing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Terrorists could easily sabotage large portions of the nation’s critical infrastructure. Security is so weak in many industrial control systems that even an average hacker could shut down water and power plants, damage nuclear facilities and freeze automobile and aircraft assembly lines.The threat is so real that right or wrong, some security experts are publicly disclosing the weakest links to force action.The Security RenegadesLeading the renegades is Dale Peterson, founder of Sunrise, Fla.-based Digital Bond, which specializes in monitor, control and alarm systems for industrial plants. Peterson runs Project Basecamp, in which researchers demonstrate the fragility of critical control systems.Basecamp’s latest target was Germany-based Smart Software Solutions, better known as 3S. Peterson’s commandos found major vulnerabilities in 3S’ CoDeSys, a software tool for programmable logic controllers (PLCs), which are computers that automate industrial tasks, such as operating valves. More than 250 ICS makers use CoDeSys.The vulnerabilities would give access to the PLC upload code without an ID or password. That means a hacker would have full control of a controller. In exposing the weakness, Basecamp researchers also released exploit tools so 3S customers could test the vulnerabilities themselves.Inadequate ResponseThe Department of Homeland Security responded with an alert that recommended manufacturers “take defensive measures to minimize the risk of exploitation of these vulnerabilities.”Tuesday, 3S confirmed the problem, saying, “We take this issue very seriously and are currently working on a solution.”At the same time, the company acknowledged that securing its products against cyber attacks was not its focus. “In general, we do not offer any standard tools in CoDeSys which are to protect the controller from a serious cyber attack.”That attitude is exactly why Peterson launched Basecamp, which he insisted discloses vulnerabilities already known to hackers and the manufacturers. His goal is to get vendors to stop making industrial control products that are “insecure by design” and to fix what is already in use. So far, his strategy hasn’t worked.“They complain and everyone says that it shouldn’t be made public, yet we still don’t see it getting corrected,” Peterson said.Was Stuxnet Not Warning Enough?What can happen when hackers gain access to an industrial control system was demonstrated in Iran in 2010. A virus dubbed Stuxnet was unleashed in an Iranian nuclear facility, damaging centrifuges used to enrich uranium. The New York Times reported that the U.S. and Israeli governments developed the malware together.3S is not the first company targeted by Basecamp. The research group disclosed in January vulnerabilities in widely used PLCs made by General Electric, Rockwell Automation, Schneider Modicon, Koyo Electronics and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories.The researchers also have released exploit modules for some of the vulnerabilities in the popular Metasploit tool kit used by security experts and hackers.Homeland Security does not support the work of groups like Basecamp. Marty Edwards, director of the department’s Control Systems Security Program, told Wired the agency “does not encourage the release of sensitive vulnerability information” until a solution is ready for distribution.A ‘Pre-9/11 Moment’Partisan politics has prevented Congress from passing a cybersecurity bill to protect the nation from attacks on critical infrastructure. Lawmakers’ inaction comes as the Obama administration warns that a strike can happen at anytime.In a speech to a group of business leaders in New York this month, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said the nation needed to heed the warning signs and bolster its cyber defenses to avoid another tragedy like the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001. According to Panetta, the country is in a “pre-9/11 moment.”How far Congress will go to force manufacturers to secure industrial systems remains to be seen. Replacing or upgrading them would be expensive and companies would lobby hard against laws that would force them to make changes.“We’ve been very disappointed in the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. government,” Peterson said. “They have not said out loud that these devices are vulnerable and need to be replaced.” Peterson said he’ll continue exposing security weaknesses.His efforts are unlikely to produce much more than an occasional headline. Creating national cyber defenses requires forceful government action, private-public interaction and cooperation among companies and industries not seen since World War II. Let’s hope that happens before we’re hit again. Tags:#basecamp#cracking#cybersecurity#hacking#legislation#regulation#security#stuxnet Related Posts center_img antone gonsalves Why You Love Online Quizzes 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac…last_img read more

Maharashtra announces rehabilitation package for submerged villages

first_imgThe Maharashtra government has announced that villages that were fully submerged in the recent floods will be rehabilitated either on State land or private land that the government is willing to buy at market rate, said Chandrakant Patil, Cabinet Minister for Revenue, PWD (Excluding Undertakings) and Guardian Minister for Kolhapur and Pune, on Wednesday.The senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader said the plan will be put in place first for over 100 villages on an immediate basis. The first of the villages to be fully rehabilitated on revenue land will be in the vicinity of Pune. “If that is not available, we will rehabilitate the village on private land,” he said.The minister also took stock of the affected areas in the region and said the government is providing all the required assistance, including ₹5,000 as immediate relief and foodgrains. Mr. Patil said the government will do everything possible to rehabilitate over 300 submerged villages in Pune and Kolhapur. “It has also undertaken on a priority basis rehabilitation of damaged bridges. We are informing the victims of State benefits made available after the floods,” he said, after the tour on Wednesday. The Maharashtra Cabinet has already announced ₹6,813-crore assistance for flood-hit people, out of which ₹4,708 crore was allocated to Kolhapur, Sangli and Satara and ₹2,105 crore to the Konkan and Nashik.The State Cabinet has already decided to pay ₹16,602 as compensation towards the destruction of a pucca home while approving ₹5,200 for partial damages. Meanwhile, ₹4,000 will be compensated for a hutment. An estimated 23,000 homes have been destroyed while others have been partially damaged, officials said. Senior officials said the Cabinet has approved ₹222 crore for rebuilding homes and may eventually tap into schemes such as Ramai Awas Yojna and Shabri Gharkul Yojna. The floods have caused damage in over 750 villages, while near 4.5 lakh people have been displaced.last_img read more

10 months ago’Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-players

first_img‘Sick for football’ – Arsenal boss Emery given bizarre nickname by ex-playersby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal manager Unai Emery earned himself a bizarre nickname while managing at Almeria.The Spaniard helped Almeria to promotion to La Liga in 2007 before earning his first big move by joining Valencia a year later.According to Romaine Molina, the author of Unai Emery: El Maestro, the 47-year-old was known as a football nut by his players.”He is mad for football, he loves it,” Molina revealed.”His nickname when he was younger was ‘infermo de futbol,’ which means ‘sick for football’.”That is what one of his former players Laurent de Palmas used to say.”He told me that the players thought he breathed football, he sleeps football, maybe he even f***s football.”And he wasn’t laughing, he was serious while he was telling me.”Emery has had an instant impact since replacing Arsene Wenger in the summer. The Gunners are currently three points behind fourth-placed Chelsea. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammates

first_imgHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammatesby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan’s owners Elliott Management are seriously considering ending the loan of Gonzalo Higuain.Corriere della Sera says Higuain is losing the confidence of management and teammates as he struggles for goals.On-loan from Juventus, Higuain can be signed permanently for €36m. But Elliott are now fast losing confidence in the deal.There are also concerns about Higuain’s status amongst the squad, where the younger players believe he is enjoying preferential treatment.Indeed, when Patrick Cutrone was hooked during the stalemate with Bologna ahead of his senior teammate, he was caught complaining to teammates in the dugout, “Why me?” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

This Yellow USC Concept Helmet Is A Pretty Interesting Design

first_imgA general view of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.LOS ANGELES – NOVEMBER 11: General view of action as the Oregon Ducks take on the USC Trojans on November 11, 2006 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The Trojans defeated the Ducks 35-10. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)When USC hits the field for the Holiday Bowl against Wisconsin on December 30, we expect the Trojans to wear their classic helmets. Going chrome with the current design is about the extend of what we see with alternate looks from the Trojans, but that doesn’t stop some of the internet’s top graphic designers from playing with some cool ideas for the program. Fresh Football Helmets and Deeyung Entertainment came up with a cool USC concept, that uses a yellow base with red details and logos.What do you think, Trojan fans?last_img read more

Ottawa suing OmniTRAX over Churchill rail

first_imgSpring flooding damaged the rail line to Churchill.APTN News Transport Canada says it is taking legal action against the owner of the Churchill rail line.The move comes after the government says OmniTRAX Inc. failed to get trains moving again on the Hudson Bay Railway Company line between the northern Manitoba communities of Gillam and Churchill.Transport Canada alleges the Denver company breached a contract the two had by failing to meet an Oct. 13, 2017 ultimatum to resume service within 30 days.“OmniTRAX Inc. did not fulfill its obligations under the terms of the contribution agreement it signed with the government of Canada in 2008,” the federal government said in a news release Tuesday.“Under the terms of the agreement, the government of Canada provided $20 million in funding for the rehabilitation of the rail line between The Pas and the Port of Churchill. Transport Canada has paid out $18.8 million to date.”Transport Canada says OmniTRAX is responsible for keeping the line operable until March 31, 2029. Or it must pay the money back.Trouble with the track halted train traffic last summer. Residents say that drove up the cost of supplies and hurt tourism.No one at OmniTRAX immediately responded to a request for comment. The company has said the rail line was damaged by flooding last spring.There are no roads into the community that rings Hudson Bay. Visitors come by train or plane. A bird’s-eye view of Churchill, Manitoba.last_img read more

Cities and counties unlikely to heed FDA warning on importing foreign drugs

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 7 2019Cities and local governments in several states said they will continue to use a Canadian company to offer employees prescription drugs at a highly reduced price, even though federal officials raised safety concerns about the practice last week.The municipalities use CanaRx, which connects their employees with brick-and-mortar pharmacies in Canada, Great Britain and Australia to fill prescriptions.In a letter Thursday to CanaRx, the Food and Drug Administration said the company has sent “unapproved” and “misbranded” drugs to U.S. consumers, jeopardizing their safety.The FDA urged consumers not to use any medicines from CanaRx, which works with about 500 cities, counties, school districts and private employers to arrange drug purchases. Some of these employers have used the service as far back as 2004.Prices of drugs from overseas pharmacies can be as much as 70 percent lower than what people pay in the U.S. because the costs are regulated by the foreign governments.FDA officials would not explain why they waited more than a decade to act. They acknowledged the agency had no reports of anyone harmed by drugs received through CanaRx.The FDA made its warning as Congress and the Trump administration look into ways to lower drug prices. Last month, Florida Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis said he has President Donald Trump’s backing to start a program to begin importing drugs from Canada for state residents.After DeSantis’ comments, White House officials stressed that any such plan must get state and federal approvals.The FDA said that in most cases importing drugs for personal use is illegal, although it very rarely has tried to stop Americans from bringing drugs across the Canadian border. It has not stopped retail stores in Florida that help consumers buy drugs from Canada since 2003. Nine storefronts were raided by FDA officials in 2017, although the FDA has allowed them to continue operating.Schenectady County in New York, which has worked with CanaRx since 2004, defended its relationship and had no immediate plans to end it, according to Chris Gardner, the county attorney. “We will wait to see how this plays out, but right now it’s status quo,” Gardner said.He said CanaRx, which is headquartered in Windsor, Ontario, helped the county save $500,000 on drug costs in 2018. About 25 percent of the county’s 1,200 workers use the program and get their drugs with no out-of-pocket costs. If they use American pharmacies, they generally have a copayment.”This is a good program, and on the merits it looks lawful, and they are not doing the terrible things that the FDA is suggesting,” Gardner said.CanaRx officials denied they were breaking any laws or putting Americans’ health at risk. They say they are not an online pharmacy but a broker between brick-and-mortar pharmacies in Canada, Australia and Great Britain and U.S. employees. People can buy drugs via CanaRx only with a prescription from their doctor.The company said it has no plans to stop distributing drugs.”The FDA’s characterizations of the CanaRx business model and operating protocols are completely wrong,” said Joseph Morris, a Chicago-based lawyer for the company. “It is not possible to place an order via any CanaRx website; the websites are informational only.”Morris said the FDA notice prompted calls from many municipalities but all so far say they plan to stick with the company.Columbia County, N.Y., has been using CanaRx for about a decade and the savings allows it to offer employees drugs with no out-of-pocket costs instead of paying up to a $40 copay in local pharmacies.Related StoriesComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USInnovative single-chip platform speeds up drug development processComputers, games, crafting keep the aging brain sharp”This is bull,” Stephen Acciani, an insurance broker who works with the county, said of the FDA crackdown. “They are not selling unsafe medications.” His recommendation would be for the county, which has more than 600 employees on its health plan, to continue using CanaRx.He noted that employees receive drugs through the mail in their original packaging from manufacturers.Kate Sharry, a benefits consultant to the city of Fall River, Mass., and more than 100 other municipalities in Massachusetts, said, “It will give some clients pause. How can you not pay attention to this from the FDA?” But she expects the local governments to stay with CanaRx.Federal health officials under both Republican and Democratic administrations have blocked efforts to legalize importing drugs, saying it’s too risky.”Sometimes a bargain is too expensive,” said Peter Pitts, a former FDA associate commissioner and president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, a New York-based nonprofit that receives some of its funding from drugmakers.Pitts, who applauded the FDA action, said it’s difficult for consumers to know when their pills from foreign pharmacies don’t have the correct potency or ingredients. He said doctors may also not realize a patient’s problem stems from issues with the medicine. Instead, the physicians may just change the medication’s dosages. He said it is not safe for Americans to buy drugs that are imported through foreign pharmacies.Gabriel Levitt, president of PharmacyChecker.com, a website for U.S. consumers that verifies international pharmacies offering drugs online, said CanaRx is one of the safest ways for Americans to get drugs from legitimate pharmacies in Canada and other industrialized counties.He said the FDA is trying to intimidate CanaRx and its local government clients. “My biggest fear is they will scare consumers and they won’t take their very safe and effective medications because they hear about this bogus warning.””The FDA’s action, which appears to try and make those programs look unsafe and sinister, seem to have a political and public relations purpose, one that is perfectly allied with the lobbying agenda of drug companies,” he said.He pointed to testimony by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb last week — just a day before the CanaRx warning. When asked about importing Canadian drugs, Gottlieb did not mention CanaRx, but he said that people going to a “brick and mortar” pharmacy in Canada “are getting a safe and effective drug. I have confidence in the Canadian drug regulatory system.” He added that his concerns are with online pharmacies.The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the industry trade and lobbying group, cheered the FDA action but denied it had any role in it, said spokeswoman Nicole Longo.”PhRMA supports the FDA’s efforts to crack down on organizations that are circumventing its robust safety and efficacy requirements,” she said. “Drug importation schemes expose Americans to potentially unsafe, counterfeit or adulterated medicines.” This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

New blood test offers more precise diagnostics of ovarian cancer

first_imgWe need to develop more accurate pre-surgery diagnostics. To detect one cancer, we operate on up to five women – yet this is currently the best option when abnormalities are detected by ultrasound and cancer is suspected. There is a great need for a simple blood test that could identify women who do not need surgery.”Karin Sundfeldt, Professor and Senior Consultant at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 20 2019The majority of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian cancer do not have cancer. A novel blood test developed by researchers at Uppsala University and the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, in Sweden, now offers the possibility of more precise diagnostics without the need for surgery. This could lead to a reduction in unnecessary surgery and to earlier detection and treatment for affected women. The study was recently published in Communications Biology.Ovarian cancer is often discovered at a late stage and has a high mortality rate. Out of 10 patients, only 3-4 survive 5 years after treatment, and there has been no test specific enough to justify screening. Women with accidental findings of an ovarian cyst or with symptoms instead undergo ultrasound and if abnormalities are seen, surgery is the only way to make sure all cancers are detected. This means that many women are operated on without having cancer, resulting in unnecessary surgery and increased risks for women. Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyIn the published study, the researchers have developed a biomarker test based on analysis of 11 proteins. The test, which is performed on a blood sample, is used where ultrasound has indicated abnormalities to identify women without cancer. For cases in which physicians chose to operate, the cancer rate could increase from one in five to one in three. This would greatly reduce unnecessary surgery and the risk of complications related to surgery.The biomarker profile can also detect borderline cases and early stages of the disease.”Our results are promising enough to consider screening for early discovery of ovarian cancer. In Sweden, we have long experience of screening for cervical cancer. I see great prospects of developing a strategy for screening for ovarian cancer as well, which could save lives and minimize the need for surgery to rule out cancer,” says Ulf Gyllensten, Professor of Medical Molecular Genetics at the Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology at Uppsala University.The paper, published in the open access journal Communications Biology (Springer Nature Publishing AG), presents a new test that has been developed in collaboration with Uppsala-based biotech company Olink Proteomics AB.”We are now continuing to evaluate the test and are performing a large-scale study of samples collected at all hospitals from the western region and Halland healthcare system,” says Gyllensten. Source:Uppsala UniversityJournal reference:Enroth, S. et al. (2019) High throughput proteomics identifies a high-accuracy 11 plasma protein biomarker signature for ovarian cancer. Communications Biology. doi.org/10.1038/s42003-019-0464-9last_img read more