Province launches more online tools for Hunters and Guide Outfitters

first_imgHunters can submit permit to accompany reports through BC Hunting Online or at a FrontCounter BC office. Reporting requirements now include harvest date and species licence number, unless exempt. Paper permit to accompany reports are no longer accepted.Royalty payments for reports can be paid through the BC Hunting Online portal, or in person at a Service BC or FrontCounter BC office.Guiding territory certificate applications, including renewals, transfers and notice of change to control of a corporation, can be completed through BC Hunting online or in person at any FrontCounter BC office. Amendments to existing applications or certificates need to be made through FrontCounter BC. VICTORIA, B.C. – Hunters and guide outfitters can now file more reports online through B.C. Hunting Online.Guide outfitters can complete and submit guide outfitter reports using B.C. Hunting Online by logging into their fish and wildlife ID profiles. Upon submission, a copy of the guide outfitter report will be automatically sent to the guided hunter’s fish and wildlife profile and stored in a database.“These changes are an important step toward meeting our commitment to improve services for rural British Columbians,” said Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. “The expansion of online services for hunters and guide outfitters simplifies processes and helps avoid cumbersome paperwork.”- Advertisement -The information recorded on the form can be submitted online within 30 days after a hunt concludes. For those with a limited internet connection, mail will continue to be an option up to 30 days after a hunt concludes. A guide outfitter can designate an agent to submit this report.For those with limited internet access in the field, a hard copy form can be used. The form is available here:https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/sports-recreation-arts-and-culture/outdoor-recreation/fishing-and-hunting/hunting/2019_guide_report_form_approved.pdfAdvertisementlast_img read more

Plants Have Social Networks

first_imgPlants may be mostly stationary, but they have connections.  They are so well connected, in fact, that they have both intranets, extranets and internets.  Inside their own vessels, they communicate with proteins and RNA molecules from root to shoot (04/23/2010); outside, they have many social relationships with other organisms.  They even “friend” their partners, just like humans do on Facebook.    Ferris Jabr wrote about plant communication on New Scientist this week.  “The botanical underground is a social network of powerful alliances and nepotism,” the article began.  “Decoding its messages could lead to radical change in farms and forests.”  Jabr wrote in terms of Darwinian competition, survival, antagonism, defense and kin selection, but the story is really about amazing mechanisms plants employ to communicate. We’ve known for some time that plants respond to one another, but only now are we realising how subtle and sophisticated their interactions can be.  Plants continually eavesdrop on each other’s chemical chatter – sometimes sympathetically, sometimes selfishly.  Some plants, like the Scandinavian rhododendron, assist their neighbours by sharing resources.  Others recognise close relatives and favour them over strangers.  And at least one parasitic plant homes in on its host’s telltale chemical scent….    “Plants don’t go out to parties or to watch the movies, but they do have a social network,” says Suzanne Simard, a forest ecologist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.  “They support each other and they fight with each other.  The more we look at plant signalling and communication, the more we learn.  It’s really incredible.”Attributing selfishness or pugnacity to plants is, of course, an unjustified anthropomorphism.  Without eyes, ears or brains, plants have uncanny abilities to send signals and respond to them.  Some of these, Jabr described in the article, are volatile compounds wafted through the air.  Even more amazing, though, are highways of fungal filaments in the soil that can relay messages and nutrients from plant to plant:Beneath the forest floor, each spoonful of dirt contains millions of tiny organisms.  These bacteria and fungi form a symbiotic relationship with plant roots, helping their hosts absorb water and vital elements like nitrogen in return for a steady supply of nutrients.    Now closer inspection has revealed that fungal threads physically unite the roots of dozens of trees, often of different species, into a single mycorrhizal network.  These webs sprawled beneath our feet are genuine social networks.Through these fungal highways, plants share not only nutrients, but information, Jabr said.  “When a caterpillar starts to munch on a tomato plant, for example, the leaves produce noxious compounds that both repel the attacker and stimulate neighbouring plants to ready their own defences.”  Plants recognize their own species and work together for the common good.  But plants are also within communities of diverse organisms that benefit from each other’s contributions to the community.    We can’t yet speak the language of plants, but we know they speak through codes made of “soluble compounds including phenols, flavonoids, sugars, organic acids, amino acids and proteins, secreted by roots into the rhizosphere.”  Even though “How these indicate relatedness is still a mystery,” a practical application would be for farmers to plant crops with the plants’ “friends” – “the strategic positioning of different crops or garden plants so they benefit one another by deterring pests, attracting pollinators and improving nutrient uptake.”  In other words, instead of planting pesticide-drenched monoculture crops, they could go back to methods of Native Americans, who used such techniques for centuries.Did these capabilities evolve slowly over millions of years?  Darwin’s “abominable mystery” – the emergence of flowering plants, the largest and most diverse group of plants on earth – was dealt another blow this week.  Beautiful, detailed leaves that look like they were pressed in a book were found exquisitely preserved in the Jehol strata in China, reported New Scientist.  Being dated at 123 million years old puts an advanced angiosperm “roughly contemporary with the ancestors of all flowering plants around today.”    Reporter Colin Barras claimed that “Flowering plants had an evolutionary edge over the conifers and other gymnosperms that were around at the time, and rapidly took over.”  The problem with such explanations, though, is not the survival of the fittest, but the arrival of the fittest.  Even assuming their own timeline, evolutionists have no explanation for how complex plants, communications networks and all, seemed to appear abruptly, fully formed, without ancestors.Darwinism is the hacker in the social network, the malware among people just wanting to share good news.(Visited 36 times, 1 visits 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Leadership workshop to inculcate skills

first_imgA leadership workshop organised here earlier this week has helped the youths inculcate skills which may be utilised for spreading awareness about gender equality and violence against women.The intervention, mainly through sports activities, has been made in the second phase of the ongoing Kadam Badhate Chalo (Let us march ahead) project here aimed at training the groups of youngsters with the requisite skills to undertake public events.The Pro Sport Development collaborated with the Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) and Martha Farrell Foundation to organise the workshop in which about three dozen youths participated. The two-day workshop was held at Umang School for the differently-abled.The young boys and girls, divided into several groups with a good gender balance, were introduced to new concepts in planning and organising the parameters of space, time, equipment and players while delivering any sports activity. Each team learnt the skills through separate planning sheets.last_img read more

Maharashtra announces rehabilitation package for submerged villages

first_imgThe Maharashtra government has announced that villages that were fully submerged in the recent floods will be rehabilitated either on State land or private land that the government is willing to buy at market rate, said Chandrakant Patil, Cabinet Minister for Revenue, PWD (Excluding Undertakings) and Guardian Minister for Kolhapur and Pune, on Wednesday.The senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader said the plan will be put in place first for over 100 villages on an immediate basis. The first of the villages to be fully rehabilitated on revenue land will be in the vicinity of Pune. “If that is not available, we will rehabilitate the village on private land,” he said.The minister also took stock of the affected areas in the region and said the government is providing all the required assistance, including ₹5,000 as immediate relief and foodgrains. Mr. Patil said the government will do everything possible to rehabilitate over 300 submerged villages in Pune and Kolhapur. “It has also undertaken on a priority basis rehabilitation of damaged bridges. We are informing the victims of State benefits made available after the floods,” he said, after the tour on Wednesday. The Maharashtra Cabinet has already announced ₹6,813-crore assistance for flood-hit people, out of which ₹4,708 crore was allocated to Kolhapur, Sangli and Satara and ₹2,105 crore to the Konkan and Nashik.The State Cabinet has already decided to pay ₹16,602 as compensation towards the destruction of a pucca home while approving ₹5,200 for partial damages. Meanwhile, ₹4,000 will be compensated for a hutment. An estimated 23,000 homes have been destroyed while others have been partially damaged, officials said. Senior officials said the Cabinet has approved ₹222 crore for rebuilding homes and may eventually tap into schemes such as Ramai Awas Yojna and Shabri Gharkul Yojna. The floods have caused damage in over 750 villages, while near 4.5 lakh people have been displaced.last_img read more