Stephen Curry: “I never want to have a reality show of my life”

first_imgOAKLAND – Unlike the Kardashians, Simon Cowell and Donald Trump, Warriors star Stephen Curry has vowed not to break this self-imposed rule.“I never want to have a reality show of my life,” Curry told Bay Area News Group.So when he weighed his latest venture with Facebook Watch, Curry admitted feeling “very skeptical” on agreeing to the project. He only did so once he realized this could be another platform to highlight his storied NBA career, while also promoting his Christian faith and …last_img read more

Raiders place Martin on IR, sign Corey Liuget

first_imgALAMEDA — The Raiders did some roster shuffling Sunday that helped clarify two positions but created more questions at another.The Raiders signed veteran free agent tackle Corey Liuget, while placing running back Doug Martin on injured reserve and waiving long-snapper Andrew DePaola.Martin, who coach Jon Gruden said had a shoulder injury, cannot come back to play for the Raiders this season. He’ll either remain on I.R. and collect his $2 million salary, or negotiate a settlement when …last_img read more

Call of the wild in Sabi Sand

first_imgThe main building at Kirkman’s Kampis a fine example of the old colonial style.(Image: Chris Thurman)MEDIA CONTACTS • Valeri MoutonandBeyond PR+27 21 532 5861 or +27 21 532 5801Chris ThurmanIt happens to everyone who encounters animals in the African bushveld, from the most experienced game ranger to the first-timer “on safari”.We see a giraffe munching on leaves and think of a baseball player chewing gum. Lionesses with cubs look to us like any human mothers of triplets would – exhausted, exasperated, while their broods run playfully over and around them.Spotting an elephant stripping the bark off a broken branch by rotating it carefully in his mouth, we find ourselves stuck between similes: is he like a craftsman, turning a piece of wood in a lathe; or a guy watching rugby on TV, working away at a tough stick of biltong?A group of young male buffalo, separated from the herd, remind us of a gang of moody, testosterone-filled teenage boys. A lone leopard, knowing no territorial boundaries and roaming over hundreds of kilometres, is Clint Eastwood or James Dean – an outlaw, a rebel without a cause.Those who like long words call this anthropomorphism: seeing human characteristics in things that aren’t human.Anthropomorphism is also what makes us pity the poor dung beetle, not only because of the unpleasant raw material Mother Nature gave him to work with, but because we see his daily struggle in terms of human endeavour. He can spend hours pushing a dung ball ten times his size up a hill, only to see it tumble down again – like Sisyphus who, in Greek mythology, was condemned to perform a similarly hopeless task for eternity as a punishment for disobeying the gods.The male, presenting his carefully crafted ball to a potential mate, may have his proposal rejected: a failed suitor. Or the female might take up his offer, and join him in making a little dung-centred home: the perfect picture of husband and wife cooperating in domestic bliss.But then there are sights that make us realise how irreconcilably different wild animals are to us. A lion at an impala kill, licking the dead animal’s neck with its rough tongue – not in a gesture of tenderness, but to soften the hide before taking the head in its mouth and cracking open the skull. A pack of hyenas chasing a leopard from a two-day-old buffalo carcass, before ripping into the rotting flesh with bloody abandon.And there are stories about animal behaviour that seem to take the survival instinct, or the law of natural selection, to extremes: lions killing the offspring of competing males, or entire prides abandoning weak cubs to save their energy for nurturing offspring that are more likely to prosper.Common groundWe sometimes think that this is what separates us from animals – but as we know all too well from the evidence of human selfishness and violence, we have much in common with a natural world that is “red in tooth and claw”.And yet, paradoxically, if we want to maintain some form of relationship with the animal kingdom we must overcome our “animalistic” impulses to destroy and, instead, desire to conserve. In the process, we might also learn how to treat our fellow-humans better.That is, I think, what lies at the heart of our collective fascination with “the bush”, and what makes game viewing a mentally, emotionally and spiritually invigorating activity. It’s the reason that a stay in the bush is top priority for most tourists to South Africa and, for South Africans, it’s the reason that our pristine savannah is a source of national pride.I was reminded of this on a recent trip to Kirkman’s Kamp in the Sabi Sand private game reserve, which shares a fenceless border with the Kruger National Park in Mpumalanga.How far we have come, as even a brief acquaintance with the human history of the Sabi-Kruger area reveals. Just over a century ago, my great-great-uncle Harry Wolhuter was a game ranger in the newly-formed Kruger Park. His conservation efforts were stymied by a close encounter with two rogue lions: he was attacked, knocked off his horse and dragged almost 100 metres, before managing to stab one of the lions and climb a tree to escape the other.Heroic stuff, indeed, and Uncle Harry’s legend has been proudly recounted by many of his successors over the years; but I’d prefer to watch a lion from the safety of a jeep, thank you.Lion countryA lion-killing Harry of an entirely different sort was Harry Kirkman. In the 1920s, Kirkman was given the job of managing a cattle ranch called Toulon Farm, owned by the foolhardy souls at the Transvaal Consolidated Land and Exploration Company.Yes, that’s right: they decided to farm cattle in an area with what was then one of the world’s highest concentrations of lions. Go figure. It was left to Mr Kirkman to deal with the leonine menace – a job he was alarmingly good at, killing over 500 lions during his six-year stay at Toulon.Fortunately, however, the land was subsequently sold to more environmentally-minded owners. Years later, the homestead once shared by Harry and his wife became the centre of Kirkman’s Kamp. This lends the lodge a “colonial” atmosphere, with large verandas and sweeping lawns offering a different aesthetic to other Sabi Sand lodges.Style and architectural charm are one thing; the socio-economic legacy of colonialism and apartheid another altogether.The “human ecology” in rural Mpumalanga – as throughout the country – remains fragile. Many people, desperate for food or some form of income, turn to poaching.For this reason andBeyond – the company that manages Kirkman’s Kamp and other lodges in the Sabi Sand area – is attempting to address community needs: turning former poachers into trackers and rangers; helping schools and families to tend their own vegetable gardens; planting trees to provide shade in which plants can grow; and, crucially, undertaking educational initiatives to prevent the spread of HIV/Aids.It seems, then, that humans and animals have more in common than we think – and protecting wilderness areas is a matter of mutual interest. So perhaps anthropomorphism isn’t such a bad thing: if we see ourselves in animals, and see animals in ourselves, we might just survive as a species after all.http://www.andbeyondafrica.com/luxury_safari/south_africa/sabi_sand_game_reserve/and_beyond_kirkmans/accommodation/and_beyond_kirkmans_kamplast_img read more

MPEDA ties up with Swiss cooperative

first_imgCOOP Cooperative, one of Switzerland’s leading retail and wholesale companies, on Sunday signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) to develop export-oriented organic aquafarming in India to cater to the growing demand for organic seafood products across the European Union.MPEDA chairman A. Jayathilak and COOP Member of Management Gerhard Zurlutter signed the MoU at the ongoing India International Seafood Show 2018.The MPEDA will identify entrepreneurs and provide them with technical advice on the production of high-quality organic shrimp that meet national and international certification protocols. COOP, which has nearly 2,200 sales outlets throughout Switzerland and wholesale/production business activities across Europe, has offered to procure the processed shrimp at a premium of up to 15% and with an additional 5% through financing for development activities, including training.Incentive for farmers“The reason why many farmers are hesitant to get into organic production is the increased costs involved. The premium price offered will offset the extra cost and incentivise them to explore organic farming,” said Mr. Jayathilak. The pilot project will be run in Kerala to produce Organic Black Tiger Shrimp, initially on about 1000 hectares. If successful, the project will be extended to other places. MPEDA and COOP will facilitate the certification of a shrimp hatchery for the production of organic shrimp seed, and certify and empanel a small-scale feed mill unit to source the organic feed.Mr. Zurlutter, who is also the head of overseas buying of frozen products for COOP, said the project in India would be their second leg in organic farming after Vietnam, where they have had success with similar projects and organic producers who are generating considerably higher revenues than conventional farmers. Towards sustainability“For us organic is not just an investment, it is the future. We are retailers with a deep-seated commitment to sustainability, and we understand that we have to get farmers into a position where they can readily adopt organic farming practices, so we support them with higher prices,” Mr. Zurlutter said.Kochi-based JASS Ventures and Baby Marine International will collaborate with COOP to organise the supply chain in Kerala and process the produce.last_img read more

10 months agoHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammates

first_imgHiguain fast losing confidence of AC Milan owners and teammatesby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan’s owners Elliott Management are seriously considering ending the loan of Gonzalo Higuain.Corriere della Sera says Higuain is losing the confidence of management and teammates as he struggles for goals.On-loan from Juventus, Higuain can be signed permanently for €36m. But Elliott are now fast losing confidence in the deal.There are also concerns about Higuain’s status amongst the squad, where the younger players believe he is enjoying preferential treatment.Indeed, when Patrick Cutrone was hooked during the stalemate with Bologna ahead of his senior teammate, he was caught complaining to teammates in the dugout, “Why me?” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoInter Milan boss Conte admits Lukaku and Brozovic clashed midweek

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Inter Milan boss Conte admits Lukaku and Brozovic clashed midweekby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveInter Milan boss Antonio Conte admits Romelu Lukaku and Marcelo Brozovic clashed in midweek.The pair scored in victory over AC Milan – just days after their clash at the end of their Champions League draw with Slavia Prague.Conte said: “Brozo and Lukaku are lovely lads and if anything, I get cross with them because they are too nice. They need to be more clinical on the field and not so naïve. If clashes happen, that’s welcome, because it means there’s blood in the veins and fire in there.“I’ve been a player, I’ve argued with teammates many times and then gone out to dinner with them afterwards. It’s not a big deal.” last_img read more

11 days agoArsenal star Lacazette: Guendouzi aims to become the best

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal star Lacazette: Guendouzi aims to become the bestby Freddie Taylor11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAlexandre Lacazette says Arsenal teammate Matteo Guendouzi wants to become the best. The 20-year-old midfielder was recently named as the Gunners’ Player of the Month for September.”He is like the younger brother [in the friendship group with me and Auba]!” Lacazette told Arsenal.com. “We all really have a good relationship, we like to work and to laugh together so it’s really good.”I’m really happy for Matteo [for being named September Player of the Month], he played really well, he helped the team when we needed him, he is really improving each season so we are all really happy with his performances this month. “We can see that every top midfielder in the world is like this [in terms of demanding the ball and being brave]. They all want to take the ball. “Matteo has a good ambition, he wants to be one of the best players in his position so every day he is trying to be the best and this month he showed that he can be.” last_img read more

Alaska putting together pieces after massive earthquake

first_imgANCHORAGE, Alaska — The supply chain of food and other goods delivered to the Port of Anchorage from the Lower 48 has not been disrupted by the powerful earthquake that caused widespread damage to roads in the Anchorage area.“The ships are coming in on schedule, the supply lines are at this point uninterrupted,” Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz said Sunday at a news conference.The magnitude 7.0 earthquake rattled the state’s largest city early Friday morning swaying buildings and fraying nerves. There were no reports of deaths, serious injuries or structural damage to buildings.Roads, however, took the brunt of the damage, especially the scenic Glenn Highway, the closest thing Alaska has to an interstate and links the state’s largest city to suburban communities to the north.Traffic has been snarled since the quake. Delays came as drivers were diverted around road damage on temporary detours or the highway was reduced to one lane while crews try to reconstruct the roadway after the temblor caused sinkholes and buckled pavement.Employees who live north of Anchorage are being encouraged to take Monday off or work from home if possible to reduce traffic. Gov. Bill Walker, who leaves office at noon Monday, gave state workers in the Anchorage area the day off to help reduce the number of cars on the highway. Schools have been closed until Dec. 10, which should also reduce traffic.Walker said he would not be travelling to the rural village of Noorvik for the swearing in of Gov.-elect Mike Dunleavy on Monday but instead would remain in Anchorage to keep working on recovery efforts.Roads aren’t the only transportation worry in Alaska.About 90 per cent of all the goods sold in Alaska are delivered to the Port of Anchorage, where officials have completed a preliminary damage assessment.“Everything looked good,” Municipal Manager Bill Falsey said. “There was some structural concerns with some of the trestles. We have got some things on a watch list but nothing that should impede operations.”Two major cargo companies operate at the port. One was offloading barges as normal on Sunday, and the other company is scheduled to offload barges Monday after successfully testing their crane system.Jet fuel was also being unloaded at another terminal Sunday.“We’re estimating we have on hand now automotive gasoline supplies that will be good for at least three weeks, and that the next shipment comes in on Dec. 7,” he said. “We’re not expecting any disruptions to those supply chains.”Officials on Saturday encouraged Alaskans not to make a run on grocery stores, saying there was no reason to hoard food.However, at least one grocery store Sunday morning had no milk and little to no bread, bottled water or bananas.Berkowitz said the stories he’s heard, particularly from grocery stores, in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake was of co-operation and sharing.“Even when people were initially concerned, people who might have been reaching for the last item, looked over and saw someone else and said, ‘Yes, we are sharing this with you,’” he said.He also touted Alaskans’ longstanding tradition to stock up for long winters.“I would encourage people, once the ships get in, once things settle back down, make sure you have the emergency preparations, the emergency kits that you should have,” he said.Schools will be closed for the week so damage assessments can be conducted on about 4,000 classrooms in 86 schools and four other facilities, comprising 8 million square feet, to make sure they are safe for staff and students, Superintendent Dr. Deena Bishop said Sunday.Mark Thiessen, The Associated Presslast_img read more

35000 donation by Tourmaline Oil allows Womens Resource Society to buy new

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Women’s Resource Society got a big boost last month after Tourmaline Oil donated the proceeds from its Annual Golf Tournament.The event, which took place at Lakepoint Golf and Country Club on July 19th, featured entertaining live and silent auctions, a 50/50 ticket draw, and a call for participants to “Fill-A-Truck” with non-perishable donations for the food pantry at the Centre.Society Board members Jen Pimm and Kelsey Dawley attended the tournament’s dinner, where Pimm spoke on behalf of the organization. “We are a front-line organization dealing with violence against women and children, community outreach, poverty, advocacy, harm reduction, food security, and much more. Your donation stays in our community and directly impacts local people. Without the support of our community, we could not do this important work, so thank you, we are very grateful.”After the tournament’s fundraising total was added up, Tourmaline said that it would like to match the donation, bringing the donation total to an incredible $35,150.“This means so much to us,” said Pimm. “We need a new furnace, and we have been trying to find room in the budget for this kind of capital expenditure. Thank you Tourmaline, the sponsors, and everyone who came out to golf!”Executive director Amanda Trotter explained that the donation was much-needed by the Society, which is currently seeing upwards of 500 clients each month.last_img read more

Tips to enjoy the Canada Day Parade in Fort St John

first_imgThe parade procession starts from the North Peace Arena parking lot and will travel North up 100 Street, turn right onto 108 Ave, turn right onto 98 street, left onto 100 Ave, and right onto 96 street to head back to the North Peace arena. The North Peace Arena parking and the back parking lot of the Pomeroy Sport Centre will be closed as a holding (marshalling) area for the floats to prep and unload after the parade. These lots will open to the public once the parade is over (approximately 1:00 pm).Those wishing to attend the parade should consider the following tips for success:Be EARLY (parking lots are limited and fill up fast)Park your vehicle and walk (it will be difficult to get a vehicle too close to 100 Street/Centennial Park)Save your spot on the sidewalk for the parade (do not sit on the road and bring your lawn chair!)Be aware that road closures will be in effect as early as 9:00 am on the day ofBe patient & polite (people running the barricades are volunteers)Obey ALL signs and orders from traffic control and barricade volunteersBe sun smart and stay hydrated!Supervise your children closely and keep them from going onto the road during the paradeStay informed! Follow the “City of Fort St. John Recreation” Facebook page for regular updatesHAVE FUN and celebrate our AMAZING country!It is important to note that the parade route does a loop. There will be a high congestion zone on 97Ave, 98Ave, and 99 Ave between 96Street and 100 Street from 11:00am-12:00 pm as surrounding roads will be blocked by the parade. It is recommended that anyone who chooses to park their vehicle in this area (near No Frills, Salvation Army, and the surrounding residential areas) do not attempt to drive until after 12:00 pm to avoid this congestion.Here is a copy of the Canada Day Parade Route FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With Canada Day set for Monday, the City of Fort St. John has shared tips to enjoy the Canada Day Parade.The Canada Day Parade will take place on July 1 at 11:00 am. This parade is volunteer-based featuring a variety of entries from non-profit organizations, businesses, and more. For safety purposes, the City has will be enforcing road closures, detours, and partial road closures. The main road closure will take place on 100 Street from 93 Ave to the south side of 100 Ave. This will be enforced by 9:00 am on the day of and will not open until after 12:00 pm.There will be roving entertainers on 100 Street between 93 and 95 Ave around 10:15 am to perform for those waiting for the parade to begin.last_img read more