Printable Flexible CarbonNanotube Transistors

first_img Applications for these flexible electronics include electronic paper, RFID (radio frequency identification) tags to track goods and people, and “smart skins,” which are materials and coatings containing electronic circuitry that can indicate changes in temperature or pressure, such as on aircraft or other objects.Printing circuits onto plastic is not a new achievement. Researchers have created printed circuits at room temperature using various semi-conducting polymers as the carrier transport medium, and many, many research groups across the globe continue to work toward perfecting the process and product.“A problem with these polymers is that they have limited carrier mobility, meaning electrons travel through them fairly slowly. This limits the speed of the devices made from them to only a few kilohertz,” said UMass Lowell Professor Xuejun Lu, the study’s corresponding researcher, to PhysOrg.com.Modern computers, by comparison, have speeds from hundreds of megahertz to more than one gigahertz.As part of the printed-electronics effort, carbon nanotubes have been investigated as a medium for high-speed transistors, with very promising results. But one method of depositing the nanotubes onto the plastic, “growing” them with heat, requires very high temperatures, typically around 900°C, which is a major obstacle for fabricating electronic devices.Additionally, transistors made from single carbon nanotubes or low-density nanotube films, which are produced by depositing a small amount of a nanotube solution onto a substrate, can carry only a small amount of current. High-density films (more than than 1,000 nanotubes per square micrometer, or millionth of a meter) are better, but most are not of sufficient quality, containing carbon “soot” that covers the nanotubes’ sidewalls and hinders carrier flow.To help solve these issues, Brewer Science, Inc. developed an electronic-grade carbon-nanotube solution. The researchers deposited a tiny droplet of the solution onto a plastic transparency film at room temperature using a syringe, a method similar to ink-jet printing.“Our electronic-grade solutions contain ultrapure carbon nanotubes without using any surfactant. Our printed transistor’s carrier mobility is much higher than similar devices developed by other groups, it exhibits a speed of 312 megahertz, and can carry a large current,” said Dr. Xuliang Han, Senior Research Engineer at Brewer Science. This research is described in the November 16, 2007, online edition of Micro & Nano Letters.Citation: Micro & Nano Letters — December 2007 — Volume 2, Issue 4, p. 96-98Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Brewer Science, Inc. have used carbon nanotubes as the basis for a high-speed thin-film transistors printed onto sheets of flexible plastic. Their method may allow large-area electronic circuits to be printed onto almost any flexible substrate at low cost and in mass quantities. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furthercenter_img Pantry ingredients can help grow carbon nanotubes Citation: Printable, Flexible Carbon-Nanotube Transistors (2008, January 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-01-printable-flexible-carbon-nanotube-transistors.htmllast_img read more

Cyclogyro Flying Robot Improves its Angles of Attack

first_img Citation: Cyclogyro Flying Robot Improves its Angles of Attack (2009, January 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-cyclogyro-robot-angles.html As the engineers explained, a key feature of the pantograph-based variable wing mechanism is that it not only changes the angles of attack, but also expands and contracts according to wing positions. By creating larger lift forces and smaller anti-lift forces, this design could provide greater flying efficiency, as well as high maneuverability. The group’s study, “Development of a Flying Robot With a Pantograph-Based Variable Wing Mechanism,” will be published in an upcoming issue of IEEE Transactions on Robotics. The mechanism is an extension of two of the authors’ earlier prototype designed in 2006, which demonstrated that a cyclogyro-based flying robot could generate enough lift force to fly and carry a very small (10 g) payload. With the new mechanism, the researchers hoped to improve the efficiency. Through simulations and experiments, they focused on demonstrating the possibility of a flying robot with a pantograph-based mechanism. The engineers explained that, in the downstroke motion, the new mechanism can generate heavy lift forces in the upward direction by expanding the wings with larger angles of attack. Conversely, in the upstroke motion, the mechanism can reduce anti-lift forces in the downward direction by contracting the wings with smaller angles of attack. Due to this folding up motion of the wings, which creates a larger wing area in a small space, the rotorcraft can get a larger lift force compared with the authors’ previous strategy. The simulations and experiments (in which the rotorcraft was tethered for stability) showed that the robot could generate a lift force exceeding its own weight. Not only could this force allow the robot to fly, it means the robot could carry a significant payload (155 g). Accounting for the robot’s four rotors, the engineers hope that it may be possible to fly the robot with a battery, some sensors, and even a control board (currently, the robot receives power from an external supply).In the future, the engineers plan to develop a detailed aerodynamic analysis of the wing motion. Eventually, they hope to develop a full-body flying robot with the optimal parameters, including four sets of pantograph-based variable wings and a stabilizing controller. With its ability to rise, hover, and go backward, a cyclogyro flying robot could one day operate as a highly maneuverable micro air vehicle.More information: Hara, Naohiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Ohtake, Hiroshi; and Wang, Hua O. “Development of a Flying Robot With a Pantograph-Based Variable Wing Mechanism.” IEEE Transactions on Robotics. To be published.© 2009 PhysOrg.com Explore further A prototype design of the cyclogyro craft with five pantograph-based variable wingunits. Image credit: Naohiro Hara, et al. (c)2009 IEEE. For climbing robots, the sky’s the limitcenter_img But one intriguing flying mechanism that has received relatively little attention is a horizontal-axis rotorcraft – or “cyclogyro” craft. First proposed in the 1930s, a cyclogyro is a unique mechanism of generating lift forces, being propelled by horizontal rotating wings. Unfortunately, the few prototypes that were built at the time were unsuccessful at flying. The essential flying principle of the cyclogyro rotorcraft is that, as the wings rotate, their angle of attack must be altered so that the wings can lift and thrust at the appropriate times in the cycle. Designing such variable wings that can alter the angles of attack has proven difficult. But recently, a team of engineers consisting of Naohiro Hara, Kazuo Tanaka, and Hiroshi Ohtake from the University of Electro-Communications in Japan, and Hua O. Wang of Boston University in the US, have developed a cyclogyro flying robot with a new kind of variable wing mechanism. The mechanism is based on a pantograph, which is a mechanical linkage that was originally developed in the 17th century as a drafting tool for copying and scaling line drawings. In the flight performance experiment, the cyclogyro robot created enough lift force to fly. Image credit: Naohiro Hara, et al. (c)2009 IEEE. (PhysOrg.com) — In the past few decades, researchers have been investigating a variety of flying machines. Most studies have focused on improving the flying performance of standard flying mechanisms, rather than developing innovative flying mechanisms. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

AMD Planning 16Core Server Chip For 2011 Release

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Intel Outlines Processor Roadmap Citation: AMD Planning 16-Core Server Chip For 2011 Release (2009, April 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-amd-core-server-chip.htmlcenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — AMD is in the process of designing a server chip with up to 16-cores. Code named Interlagos, the server chip will contain between 12 and 16 cores and will be available in 2011. Pat Patia, VP of AMD’s server platform unit stated that increasing chip core counts will improve performance and reduce power consumption by the processors. The increase of server chip cores can reduce the total power consumption and server count in a data center.The 16-core chips can be deployed in servers with two to four chip sockets thereby maximizing each server with up to 64 cores. The chip will be part of AMD’s Opteron 6000 series chips. AMD’s Opteron chips compete with Intel’s 8-core version of its Xeon server chips, code named Nehalem-EX, which is due for release in 2010.AMD’s future chips will integrate advanced power management features and improved instruction sets for better task executions in virtualized environments. By manually capping the power drawn by cores, users will be able to better control power consumption. Along with AMD’s new server chips, there are plans to add additional memory and cache support in the server platforms. One feature that would be lacking in these new chips is multithreading which allows cores to execute multiple threads and task simultaneously; this feature however is currently used in Intel’s chips. The new chips, made by AMD, will be made using the 32-nanometer manufacturing process which is more energy efficient and has better performance than the current 45-nanometer process. AMD’s goal is to add more complex features onto the surface of a processor chip so that it can handle a larger number of applications.© 2009 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Scientists Make TemperatureRegulating Coffee Mug

first_imgThe PCM absorbs the warmth of the mug’s content, stores it and brings it down to the optimal temperature. Then the PCM helps maintain the content’s temperature at this optimal level by slowly releasing the stored heat back into the mug’s contents. Image credit: Fraunhofer IBP. (PhysOrg.com) — A well-insulated mug may keep your coffee somewhat warm, but now scientists have designed a high-tech mug that can keep drinks hot or cold at the perfect temperature for up to half an hour. Citation: Scientists Make Temperature-Regulating Coffee Mug (2009, August 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-08-scientists-temperature-regulating-coffee.html Intel, STMicroelectronics Deliver Industry’s First Phase Change Memory Prototypes Researchers Klaus Sedlbauer and Herbert Sinnesbichler from the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics have created the temperature-regulating mug using phase change material (PCM). PCM is capable of storing and releasing large amounts of heat by changing its phase, such as changing from a solid to a liquid. To design the new mug, the researchers first created a hollow porcelain shell filled with ribbons of highly conductive aluminum. The aluminum formed a honeycomb structure, which the researchers filled with solid PCM. When the mug is filled with a hot beverage, the PCM absorbs the heat and melts like wax into a liquid. This process cools the beverage down to the optimal temperature. As the beverage cools over time, the PCM slowly releases the stored heat back into the drink, maintaining the optimal temperature for up to 30 minutes.As the scientists note, different drinks have different optimal temperatures. Warm drinks such as coffee and tea are best enjoyed at 58° C (136.4° F), beer tastes best at 7° C (44.6° F), and ice-cold drinks are best at -12° C (10.4° F). Since different types of PCM have different chemical properties and melting temperatures, the scientists can make different mugs for different beverages. The downside for the consumer is that there is not a single mug for hot and cold drinks.The researchers hope that, if they can find a business partner, the PCM mugs could be on sale by the end of the year. However, despite the fact that PCM is relatively inexpensive, the mugs will still probably cost significantly more than most mugs. Besides mugs, PCM could have other interesting applications. For instance, researchers are investigating the possibility of using it to keep perishable foods from spoiling, and even putting it on museum walls to protect paintings in the case of a fire, since PCM is non-flammable. PCM already has commercial uses in construction materials, where it is embedded in walls and ceilings to maintain a comfortable room temperature. Some winter jackets also contain PCM for providing greater warmth. In addition, due to their long-term memory capabilities, PCM could be used for storing computer data without the need for an electric current.via: Spiegel© 2009 PhysOrg.com Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Out of Africa date brought forward

first_imgÖtzi the Iceman, a well-preserved natural mummy of a Chalcolithic (Copper Age), who was found in 1991 in the Schnalstal glacier in the Ötztal Alps. Credit: South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology (Phys.org) —A study on human mitochondrial DNA has led to a new estimate of the time at which humans first began to migrate out of Africa, which was much later than previously thought. Triple burial from Dolni Vestonice in the Czech Republic. Credit: J. Svoboda Explore further The new study sequenced mitochondrial DNA from fossils of ancient modern humans rather than living humans. The fossils were dated using radiocarbon dating methods. Since the samples were from humans who lived up to 40,000 years ago, mutations that have occurred in the genome since they died would be missing, and the samples provided a range of calibration points for their estimation of the start of the migration.The disagreement in dating the migration between the new study and previous genetic research could be due to underestimating the number of new mutations in a generation of living humans because of the difficulty of discriminating between true mutations and mistaken ones and because of a desire to avoid false positives. Under-counting would lead to an older estimate for the migration from Africa and other important events.The new date, which agrees with the archaeological evidence, shows that modern humans were in Europe and Asia before and after the most recent glaciation, and they were therefore able to survive and adapt to a dramatically changing climate.The paper was published in the journal Current Biology on 21st March. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New ancestor? Scientists ponder DNA from Siberiacenter_img The new study by an International group of evolutionary geneticists used mitochondrial DNA from the remains of ancient modern humans to estimate the rate of genetic mutations. Three of the skeletons were from the Czech Republic and dated at 31,000 years old, two were 14,000 years old, from Oberkassel, Germany. Another sample used was the natural mummy Ötzi the Iceman, who lived some time between 3350 and 3100 BC. The most recent skeleton was that of a man who lived in medieval France 700 years ago, while the oldest was dated at 40,000 years ago, and came from Tianyuan in China.The results suggest that the genetic divergence between African and non-African humans began between 62 and 95 thousand years ago, which tallies with other studies estimating the time through dating of stone tools and fossils, but they disagree with the results of recent genetic studies that estimated the migration began much earlier, up to 130 thousand years ago or even before.The previous studies sequenced the entire genome of living humans to count the number of genetic mutations (around 50) in newborn babies compared to the parents to determine the generational mutation rate. This then provided the a molecular “clock,” which could be extrapolated backwards to date important events in human evolution. Journal information: Current Biology © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Out of Africa date brought forward (2013, March 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-africa-date-brought.html More information: A Revised Timescale for Human Evolution Based on Ancient Mitochondrial Genomes, Current Biology, 21 March 2013, DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.02.044 www.cell.com/current-biology/r … ii/S0960982213002157last_img read more

Thermodynamic analysis reveals large overlooked role of oil and other energy sources

first_imgA newer model of economic growth includes not only capital and labor, but also energy and creativity as production factors. Energy is placed on equal footing as capital and labor. Credit: R. Kümmel. The Second Law of Economics: Energy, Entropy, and the Origins of Wealth Citation: Thermodynamic analysis reveals large overlooked role of oil and other energy sources in the economy (2014, December 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-thermodynamic-analysis-reveals-large-overlooked.html (Phys.org)—The laws of thermodynamics are best known for dealing with energy in the context of physics, but a new study suggests the same concepts could help improve economic growth models by accounting for energy in the economic sphere. Polluting China for the sake of economic growth In neoclassical growth models, there are two main contributing factors to economic growth: labor and capital. However, these models are far from perfect, accounting for less than half of actual economic growth. The rest of the growth is accounted for by the Solow residual, which is thought to be attributed to the difficult-to-quantify factor of “technological progress.”Although neoclassical growth models help economists understand economic growth, the fact that they leave so much economic growth unexplained is a little unsettling. Even Robert A. Solow, the founder of neoclassical growth theory, stated that the neoclassical model “is a theory of growth that leaves the main factor in economic growth unexplained.” Energy, a powerful factor of production In a new study published in the New Journal of Physics, Professor Reiner Kümmel at the University of Würzburg and Dr. Dietmar Lindenberger at the University of Cologne argue that the missing ingredient represented by the Solow residual consists primarily of energy. They show that, for thermodynamic reasons, energy should be taken into account as a third production factor, on an equal footing with the traditional factors capital and labor. (By definition, labor represents the number of work hours per year. Capital refers to the capital stock that is listed in the national accounts, which consists of all energy-converting devices, information processors, and the buildings and installations necessary for their protection and operation. Energy includes fossil and nuclear fuels, as well as alternative energy sources.)The new proposal lies in stark contrast to neoclassical growth models, in which the production factors have very different economic weights, representing their productive powers. In neoclassical growth models, these economic weights or “output elasticities” are set equal to each production factor’s cost share: Labor’s cost share is 70%, capital’s is 25%, and energy’s is just 5%. Real-world implicationsTo test their model on reality, Kümmel and Lindenberger applied it to reproduce the economic growth of Germany, Japan, and the US from the 1960s to 2000, paying particular attention to the two oil crises. In neoclassical models, reductions of energy inputs by 7%, as observed during the first energy crisis in 1973-1975, should have caused total economic output reductions of only 0.35%, whereas observed reductions were up to an order of magnitude larger. By using the larger weight of energy, the new model can explain a much larger portion of the total output reductions during this time. If correct, their findings have major implications. First, the new model doesn’t require the Solow residual at all; this residual disappears from the graphs that show the empirical and the theoretical growth curves. Energy, along with the addition of a smaller “human creativity” factor, accounts for all of the growth that neoclassical models attribute to technological progress.Second, and somewhat unsettling, is the impact that the findings may have in the real world. In 2012, the International Monetary Fund stated in its World Economic Outlook that “…if the contribution of oil to output proved to be much larger than its cost share, the effects could be dramatic, suggesting a need for urgent policy action.” According to the authors’ analysis, the high productive power of cheap energy and the low productive power of expensive labor has implications that we can easily observe. On one hand, the average citizens of highly industrialized countries enjoy a material wealth that is unprecedented in history. On the other hand, cheap, powerful energy-capital combinations are increasingly replacing expensive, weak labor in the course of increasing automation. This combination kills jobs for the less skilled part of the labor force. It is also why far fewer people work in agriculture and manufacturing today than in the past, and more people work in the service sector—although even here, computers and software are replacing labor or causing job outsourcing to low-wage countries. This well-known trend can be understood by the new model’s message that energy is cheaper and more powerful than labor. Where is equilibrium?At the heart of Kümmel and Lindenberger’s model is the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium. As the researchers explain, economies are supposed to operate in an equilibrium where an objective, such as profit or overall welfare, has a maximum. To maximize these objectives, neoclassical economics assumes that there are no constraints on the combinations of capital, labor, and energy. With no constraints, economic equilibrium is characterized by the equality of output elasticities and cost shares, which is one of the assumptions of neoclassical growth models as described above.In their new model, Kümmel and Lindenberger apply the same optimization principles, but also take into account technological constraints on production factor combinations. In reality, a production system cannot operate at more than full capacity, and its degree of automation at a given time is limited by the quantities of energy-conversion devices and information processors that the system can accommodate at that time. Further, legal and social obligations may place “soft” constraints on the production factors, particularly labor.In the new model, these technological constraints on the production factors prevent modern industrial economies from reaching the neoclassical equilibrium where the output elasticities of capital, labor and energy are equal to these factors´ cost shares. Rather, the equilibrium of real-life economies, which are limited by technological constraints, is far from the neoclassical equilibrium.While the model provides a new perspective of economic growth, the ultimate question still remains: what kinds of strategies will stimulate economic growth and reduce unemployment and emissions? Whatever the answer, the results here suggest that it must account for the pivotal role of energy in economic production.”Within the present legal framework of the market, one needs economic growth to ban the specter of unemployment,” the researchers explain. “Energy-driven economic growth, in turn, may lead to increasing environmental perturbations, because, according to the first and second law of thermodynamics, nothing happens in the world without energy conversion and entropy production. And entropy production is associated with the emissions of heat and particles, notably carbon dioxide as long the world uses fossil fuels at the present rate.”Kümmel is also the author of a book on the subject called The Second Law of Economics: Energy, Entropy, and the Origins of Wealth. Explore further More information: Reiner Kümmel and Dietmar Lindenberger. “How energy conversion drives economic growth far from the equilibrium of neoclassical economics.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/16/12/125008 (Left) Economic growth and (right) contributions of the three main production factors to economic growth in Germany in the late 20th century. Credit: R. Kümmel. The Second Law of Economics: Energy, Entropy, and the Origins of Wealth In their analysis, the researchers found that, unlike in neoclassical models, the economic weights of energy and labor are not equal to their cost shares. While the economic weight of energy is much larger than its cost share, that of labor is much smaller. This means that energy has a much higher productive power than labor, which is mainly because energy is relatively cheap while labor is expensive. © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: New Journal of Physics This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Wyoming Strives To Use Medicaid To Reduce Air

first_imgWyoming Strives To Use Medicaid To Reduce Air Ambulance… pidjoe by NPR News Markian Hawryluk 8.23.19 11:07am Wyoming, which is among the reddest of Republican states and a bastion of free enterprise, thinks it may have found a way to end crippling air ambulance bills that sometimes top $100,000 per flight.The state’s unexpected solution: Undercut the free market, by using Medicaid to treat air ambulances like a public utility.Costs for such emergency transports have been soaring, with some patients facing massive, unexpected bills as the free-flying air ambulance industry expands with cash from profit-seeking private-equity investors. The issue has come to a head in Wyoming, where rugged terrain and long distances between hospitals forces reliance on these ambulance flights.Other states have tried to rein in the industry, but have continually run up against the Airline Deregulation Act, a federal law that preempts states from regulating any part of the air industry.So, Wyoming officials are instead seeking federal approval to funnel all medical air transportation in the state through Medicaid, a joint federal-state program for residents with lower incomes. The state officials plan to submit their proposal in late September to Medicaid’s parent agency, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; the plan will still face significant hurdles there.If successful, however, the Wyoming approach could be a model for the nation, protecting patients in need of a lifesaving service from being devastated by a life-altering debt.”The free market has sort of broken down. It’s not really working effectively to balance cost against access,” says Franz Fuchs, a policy analyst for the Wyoming Department of Health. “Patients and consumers really can’t make informed decisions and vote with their dollars on price and quality.”Freewheeling free market systemThe air ambulance industry has grown steadily in the U.S., from about 1,100 aircraft in 2007 to more than 1,400 in 2018. During that same time, the fleet in Wyoming has grown from three aircraft to 14. State officials say an oversupply of helicopters and planes is driving up prices, because air bases have high fixed overhead costs. Fuchs says companies must pay for aircraft, staffing and technology, such as night-vision goggles and flight simulators — incurring 85% of their total costs before they fly a single patient.But with the supply of aircraft outpacing demand, each air ambulance is flying fewer patients. Nationally, air ambulances have gone from an average of 688 flights per aircraft in 1990, as reported by Bloomberg, to 352 in 2016. So, companies have raised their prices to cover their fixed costs and to seek healthy returns for their investors.A 2017 report from the federal Government Accountability Office notes that the three largest air ambulance operators are for-profit companies with a growing private equity investment. “The presence of private equity in the air ambulance industry indicates that investors see profit opportunities in the industry,” the report says.While precise data on air ambulance costs is sparse, a 2017 industry report says air ambulance companies spend an average of $11,000 per flight. In Wyoming, Medicare pays an average of $6,000 per flight, and Medicaid pays even less. So air ambulance companies shift the remaining costs — and then some — to patients who have private insurance or are paying out-of-pocket.As that cost-shifting increases, insurers and air ambulance companies haven’t been able to agree on in-network rates. So the services are left out of insurance plans.When a consumer needs a flight, it’s billed as an out-of-network service. Air ambulance companies then can charge whatever they want. If the insurer pays part of the bill, the air ambulance company can still bill the patient for the rest — a practice known as balance billing.”We have a system that allows providers to set their own prices,” says Dr. Kevin Schulman, a Stanford University professor of medicine and economics. “In a world where there are no price constraints, there’s no reason to limit capacity, and that’s exactly what we’re seeing.”Nationally, the average helicopter bill has now reached $40,000, according to a 2019 GAO report — more than twice what it was in 2010. State officials say Wyoming patients have received bills as high as $130,000.Because consumers don’t know what an air ambulance flight will cost them — and because their medical condition may be an emergency — they can’t choose to go with a lower-cost alternative, either another air ambulance company or a ground ambulance.A different way of doing thingsWyoming officials propose to reduce the number of air ambulance bases and strategically locate them, to even out access. The state would then seek bids from air ambulance companies to operate those bases at a fixed yearly cost. It’s a regulated monopoly approach, similar to the way public utilities are run.”You don’t have local privatized fire departments springing up and putting out fires and billing people,” Fuchs says. “The town plans for a few fire stations, decides where they should be strategically, and they pay for that fire coverage capacity.”Medicaid would cover all the air ambulance flights in Wyoming — and then recoup those costs by billing patients’ insurance plans for those flights. A patient’s out-of-pocket costs would be capped at 2% of the person’s income or $5,000, whichever is less, so patients could easily figure out how much they would owe. Officials estimate they could lower private insurers’ average cost per flight from $36,000 to $22,000 under their plan.State Rep. Eric Barlow, who co-sponsored the legislation, recognizes the irony of a GOP-controlled, right-leaning legislature taking steps to circumvent market forces. But the Republican said that sometimes government needs to make sure its citizens are not being abused.”There were certainly some folks with reservations,” he says. “But folks were also hearing from their constituents about these incredible bills.”Industry pushbackAir ambulance companies have opposed the plan. They say the surprise-billing problem could be eliminated if Medicare and Medicaid covered the cost of flights and the companies wouldn’t have to shift costs to other patients. They question whether the state truly has an oversupply of aircraft and warn that reducing the number of bases would increase response times and cut access to the lifesaving service.Richard Mincer, an attorney who represents the for-profit Air Medical Group Holdings in Wyoming, says that while 4,000 patients are flown by air ambulance each year in the state, it’s not clear how many more people have needed flights when no aircraft was available.”How many of these 4,000 people a year are you willing to tell, ‘Sorry, we decided as a legislature you’re going to have to take ground ambulance?’ ” Mincer said during a June hearing on the proposal.But Wyoming officials say it indeed might be more appropriate for some patients to take ground ambulances. The vast majority of air ambulance flights in the state, they say, are transfers from one hospital to another, rather than on-scene trauma responses. The officials say they’ve also heard of patients being flown for medical events that aren’t an emergency, such as a broken wrist or impending gallbladder surgery.Air ambulance providers say such decisions are out of their control: They fly when a doctor or a first responder calls.But air ambulance companies do have ways of drumming up business: They heavily market memberships that cover a patient’s out-of-pocket costs, eliminating any disincentive for the patient to fly. Companies also build relationships with doctors and hospitals that can influence the decision to fly a patient; some have been known to deliver pizzas to hospitals by helicopter to introduce themselves.Mincer, the Air Medical Group Holdings attorney, says the headline-grabbing, large air ambulance bills don’t reflect what patients end up paying directly. The average out-of-pocket cost for an air ambulance flight, he says, is about $300.The industry also has tried to shift blame onto insurance plans, which the transporters say refuse to pay their fair share for air ambulance flights and refuse to negotiate lower rates.Doug Flanders, director of communications and government affairs for the medical transport company Air Methods, says the Wyoming plan “does nothing to compel Wyoming’s health insurers to include emergency air medical services as part of their in-network coverage.”The profit modelOther critics of the status quo maintain that air ambulance companies don’t want to change, because the industry has seen investments from Wall Street hedge funds that rely on the balance-billing business model to maximize profits.”It’s the same people who have bought out all the emergency room practices, who’ve bought out all the anesthesiology practices,” says James Gelfand, senior vice president of health policy for the ERISA Industry Committee, a trade group representing large employers. “They have a business strategy of finding medical providers who have all the leverage, taking them out of network and essentially putting a gun to the patient’s head.”The Association of Air Medical Services counters that the industry is not as lucrative as it’s made out to be, pointing to the recent bankruptcy of PHI Inc., the nation’s third-largest air ambulance provider.Meanwhile, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Wyoming is supportive of the state’s proposal and looks forward to further discussion about the details if approved, according to Wendy Curran, a vice president at the health insurance firm. “We are on record,” Curran says, “as supporting any effort at the state level to address the tremendous financial impacts to our [Wyoming] members when air ambulance service is provided by an out-of-network provider.”The Wyoming proposal also has been well received by employers, who like the ability to buy into the program at a fixed cost for their employees, providing a predictable annual cost for air ambulance services.”It is one of the first times we’ve … seen a proposal where the cost of health care might actually go down,” says Anne Ladd, CEO of the Wyoming Business Coalition on Health.The real challenge, Fuchs says, will be convincing federal officials to go along with it.Kaiser Health News is a nonprofit, editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. KHN is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.Copyright 2019 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

Reviving the languages

first_imgBol Bosh, a website about the diverse languages, literatures and folklore of Kashmir, curated by Asiya Zahoor was launched at Oxford Bookstore Connaught Place in the Capital. Author Namita Gokhale launched the website on 5 August followed by a presentation and discussion with Basharat Ali and Asiya Zahoor.Bol Bosh in Kashmiri refers to communication, in the most endearing way. It aims to focus on those languages and oral and folk literatures in particular that are lesser known. Though these literatures are aesthetically appealing, culturally rich and historically significant, they have a very less or no visibility. By bringing these on a digital platform Bol Bosh aims to make such narratives accessible to the wider world. Some of the languages that are being revived through Bol Bosh are Pashtu, Gojri, Pahari, Dogri, Kohistani, Sheikhagal, Poguli, Shina, Bhaderwahi, Ladhki and Burushaski. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Asiya Zahoor lives and teaches in Baramulla, Kashmir. Her persisting passion for education since childhood led her to volunteer for teaching various schools in adjacent villages of Baramulla in addition to teaching at a colleges. She has known education as a tool of empowerment. Her interest in language and literature drove her to Oxford University. Basharat Ali pursued his Bachelor’s Degree from Government College Baramulla, University of Kashmir. From his childhood he had the urge and desire to contribute to his society by being a change. Ali has dedicated himself selflessly to the development of the society.last_img read more

Its all about Delhi

first_imgDHF (Delhi Heritage Foundation) organised the first talk under the Delhi Heritage Lecture Series on ‘Establishment and Growth of Hindu College in the Walled City: Post 1857 Intellectual Hulchul’ by Kavita Sharma (Former Principal Hindu College), Director IIC at its headquarter on 13 August. The session was a part of elaborate initiatives planned to present the unexplored of Delhi for its own residents and spread awareness. DHF has been set up with a mission to preserve and promote heritage of one of the oldest cities in the country. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The key objectives of DHF are – to preserve and promote the heritage, culture, monuments and history of Delhi and to encourage public involvement in heritage preservation.DHF has signed the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Delhi Walks, a walking tour vertical founded by Sachin Bansal to connect and showcase both the historical and contemporary facets of Delhi as mélange of cultures. Another MOU has been signed with Shoobh Group Welfare Society under the banner of Bharat Gauba, a non-profit community based organisation, which has worked on different social issues and shall be taking Delhi heritage to schools and colleges through a wide array of specially designed programmes. It will soon be announcing a major initiative that includes lectures series, seminars, conferences, workshops and publications.last_img read more

Of classic symphony

first_imgBe all set to be mersmerised by the duet performance by sitar exponent, Azeem Ahmed Alvi and tabla player Ustad Akram Khan Sitar Player on December 21 at the Triveni Kala Sangam at Mandi house in the Capital. Azeem Alvi’s composition has been composed in different taals like rupak, ektaal, teental. Azeem will play raag yaman with alaap jod jhaha. The composition in rupak tala will start after half beat. On the other hand Ustad Akram Khan will accompany the taals on table Azeem Ahmed Alvi, is one of India’s leading and Internationally known artiste in world music. Born in the family of classical Indian music as a tradition for six generations, he is deeply rooted in the Indian classical music and studied under Ustad Mohsin Ali Khan till the age of six. He gained his true potential and skill India’s biggest Sitar living legend, also from this family and his ‘Guru’ Padmashree awarded, Ustad Shahid Parvez Khan and his father  the renowned and respected Sitar maestros Ustad Sayyed Ahmed Alvi. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Only in his twenties, Azeem Ahmed Alvi has established a strong foothold in the contemporary music scene both, in India and abroad. Already known to be one of the foremost sitar players of the world, he aspires to bridge the gap between Indian classical and western contemporary music. Through his musical expertise, he has dabbled in diverse genres like Sufi, Flamenco, Jazz, Electronica and Western Classical music.In 2012, he took his passion for traditional Indian music and the Sitar to a new level with the creation of his NGO, the Raag Mantra Music Foundation. He has recently concluded his 15th European tour with Harry Stojka when he performed at the Jazz Festival in Vienna, Stuttgart in Germany at the World Music Festival, Jazz-Fest in Nurnberg, Germany amongst many others. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAkram Khan received his initial training in music from Late Ustad Niazu Khan who was famous for his technical style and guidance. He is also fortunate to have learnt from his great grandfather Ustad Mohd Shafi Khan. He continues his riyas and training under the able guidance of his father Ustad Ashmat Ali Khan. He has also undergone formal training at The Prayag Sangeet Samiti, Allahabad and passed the Sangeet Praveen (Master Of Music) From there apart from Sangeet Visharad at Chandigarh. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Commerce. He is also a top grade artiste from All India Radio, New Delhi.When: December 21 Where: Amphitheater, Triveni Kala Sangam,  Mandi Houselast_img read more

Airport authorities bat for proper waste disposal to avoid bird hits

first_imgKolkata: In a stride towards curbing incidents of bird hit at the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International (NSCBI) Airport, the airport director has urged all the municipalities in and around the vicinity of the airport to have a proper waste disposal system in place.”I have requested the concerned officials to maintain a suitable garbage disposal mechanism, as well as proper cleaning of the drainage system in the localities surrounding Kolkata Airport, to avoid any bird hit,” airport director Atul Dikshit said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe meeting of the Airfield Environment Management Committee was held at the airport director’s office on Thursday, under the chairmanship of Atri Bhattacharya, state Home and Hill Affairs Secretary.”Opening of meat shops, waste disposal system and drainage system around the vicinity of the airport were the major points of discussion, as they are the primary causes of attracting birds around the airport,” a senior airport official said.A request was also made by the airport director to the concerned authority to ask the Forest department officials to give permission to use tranquilisers for catching wild animals around the airport. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedApart from senior officials of Airports Authority of India, representatives from municipalities, state Pollution Control Board, PWD, CPWD, Irrigation department and other stakeholders were also present.Another meeting of the Aerodrome Committee was also held on Thursday. “Measures taken during any eventuality of hijacking were deliberated in the meet. Role and responsibility of all the government agencies and stakeholders involved was also discussed and re-emphasised,” the official added.Before the two important meetings, a mock anti-hijacking drill was conducted, wherein the response time of various agencies involved in the exercise was checked.”We are constantly conducting various exercises to ensure that our concerned employees are ready to tackle any sort of emergency situation at the airport,” the official said.last_img read more

BJP to organize nationwide protest programmes over Purulia killings

first_imgKolkata: The BJP leadership is planning to organize nation-wide agitation against the alleged killing of two party workers in West Bengal’s Purulia district, a senior party leader said today.The party has planned to hold protests and demonstrations in all the state capitals and New Delhi between June 18-June 24 against the alleged killing of two BJP activists Dulal Kumar and Trilochan Mahato, BJP national secretary Rahul Sinha said.”During this agitation programme we will speak about the reign of terror in West Bengal under TMC rule. We will also organize similar agitation programmes in all West Bengal districts during the same time,” he told PTI. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsA senior state BJP leader said at a time when TMC supremo and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee is trying to pitch herself as the fulcrum of the anti-BJP alliance, the nation wide agitation will “expose the reign of terror TMC in Bengal”.Two BJP activists – 35-year-old Dulal Kumar and 20-year-old Trilochan Mahato were found hanging in West Bengal’s Purulia district on June 2 and May 31 respectively.BJP president Amit Shah will visit Purulia’a Balrampur area, where the bodies of two men were found hanging allegedly in the wake of panchayat elections. He is scheduled to pay a two-day visit to the state from June 27, BJP state general secretary Sayantan Basu said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedAfter the death of Mahato, Shah had tweeted “Deeply hurt by the brutal killing of our young karyakarta, Trilochan Mahato, in Balarampur, West Bengal. A young life full of possibilities was brutally taken under state’s patronage. He was hanged on a tree just because his ideology differed from that of state sponsored goons.”The BJP president had tweeted again after the death of Dulal Kumar. “Distressed to know about yet another killing of BJP karyakarta Dulal Kumar in Balarampur, West Bengal. This continued brutality and violence in the land of West Bengal is shameful and inhuman. Mamata Banerjee’s govt has completely failed to maintain law and order in the state.”The alleged killings had created a political controversy as the BJP had performed well against TMC in Balarampur area of Purulia district in the recent panchayat elections.The BJP had alleged the deaths were “political murders” and demanded a CBI inquiry into the incidents.The BJP had alleged that the TMC was behind the killing. TMC has denied the charge.last_img read more

Greenfield University Bill to be tabled in Assembly today

first_imgDarjeeling: Darjeeling district is all set to get a new state university. “The Greenfield University Bill, 2018″ is all set to be tabled in the state Assembly on Tuesday, which willpave the way for the new university.”A university has been a long standing demand of the Hills. Since we took charge of the Gorkhaland Territorial Administration, we have been constantly corresponding with the government for a separate university. The state government has conceded and a Bill to this effect will be tabled in the state Assembly on Tuesday,” stated Binay Tamang, chairman, Board of Administrators, Gorkhaland Territorial Administration. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeTamang stated that even the Memorandum of Agreement signed between the Union government, state government and the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha that paved the way for the GTA, mentions the formation of a central university in Darjeeling.”With the NDA coming to power in the Centre, we have been constantly demanding that the central university be constituted as per the agreement. However, the BJP government only raises this issue during elections and the matter has not progressed an inch,” stated Tamang. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe new university will come up at Yogighat in Mongpu in Darjeeling district. “The District Magistrate, Darjeeling and the GTA have already identified 100 acres of land for the university at Yogighat. The details have been sent to the Land and Land Reforms department of the state government,” added Tamang.The GTA chairman expressed hope that Hill colleges will be affiliated to this university in the next few years. “Darjeeling is known for her educational institutions. There are very good schools and colleges here. We hope that by the year 2020, all these colleges will be affiliated to the Greenfield University,” stated Tamang. Incidentally, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has stressed on the need for the revival of Darjeeling as an education hub. The new university is part of the state government’s plans in this direction.”The Greenfield University Bill 2018″ is aimed at constituting and incorporating a state-aided affiliating university in the district of Darjeeling, along with aiding it to function as a teaching, training and research centre in various branches, including Humanities, Social and basic sciences, Management studies on tea, Forestry, Mountaineering and earth studies.In the initial stages the university will impart undergraduate and post graduate courses. It has also been proposed that all colleges and institutions imparting courses within the district of Darjeeling will be affiliated to this university in due course.last_img read more

Spaces that weave memories

first_imgUnravelling the fascinating bond that exists between people, places and memories, ‘The Festival of Places’ is a unique event which aims to highlight the rich cultural legacy of places that exist in Indian cities, towns and villages. It explores the invaluable cultural fabric and a memory associated with places and provides an opportunity for people to share their personal narratives. The festival is also about understanding the idea of ‘Space as a Place’; about exploring ‘Places’ that form an integral part of cities and towns; about experiencing ‘places as vital and meaningful connected spaces’ through which urban life throbs; and rediscovering the lost art of creating vibrant places that nurture culture and creativity. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe Festival conceptualised by CATTS, a not-for-profit organisation working in the area of heritage conservation and management, has been envisaged as a convergence of people from all walks of life and disciplines who seek a deeper understanding of Indian culture through the places we live in as well as share an eagerness to rejuvenate them. The festival encourages participation of people of all ages and experience for developing an in-depth understanding of the places and spaces we live in, seeking people to play an active role both in the creation of new places and the preservation and sustenance of existing ones. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIt will inspire people to enjoy and creatively engage with places in cities for meaningful action. And will motivate people to reimagine, reclaim and revitalize places especially the ones in the public realm. It will encourage people to think about sustenance and resilience, about accessibility and mobility, about the future of their cities and communities. In this sense, the festival goes beyond just being an event to becoming a community movement for reviving and re-imagining places at the heart of healthy and vibrant communities.last_img read more

Folk music performance captivates audience

first_imgMaking the state of Bengal proud, Delhi-based music director and singer Runki Goswami gave a scintillating live folk music performance at India International Centre. Runki’s phenomenal multilingual show was a pure and joyful celebration of diverse country that we inhabit. Her performance in 18 different languages not only connected all but also left the audience spellbound.With controlled and mastered vocals, Runki, captivated music lovers by setting up a majestic mood with her journey from north to south through a myriad of rustic folk songs of India; thus engaging the audience in musical expression with multiple languages. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe recitals were the mirror image of the unfazed legacy of different states; their culture, customs, beliefs and faith. And that’s not it – every state has more than one kind of a folk – it varies from caste to seasons with changing pattern of rhythms and lyrics. Uniquely fascinating, the folk songs sung by Runki captured glimpses of this treasure trove. Starting the concert from Rajasthan with its Gorbandh, Jhoomar and Maand singing style, Runki rendered original Mirzapuri Kajri’s of UP, Nakta’s of Bihar and so on. It was a real treat for music lovers as Runki musically hopped in and out of states, seamlessly rekindling the dormant familiarity. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSome well-known songs handpicked and chosen by Runki were – Loomba Jhoomba, Luk Chhip and Kesariya Baalam of Rajasthan, Rangi Saari, Saiya mile and many more from UP and Bihar, Bhedu Paako, Morni’s and many other sounds of the hills. Bihu, Bawl, Jatra, Dandiya, Lavani and South Indian folk were covered in her renditions as well. Accompanied by Virender Singh on rhythms, Saif Ali Khan and Hemanth Juyal on guitar, Runki mesmerised the audience with some great rustic folk songs in its original form. The performance lasted for an hour and received an overwhelming response from the listeners.last_img read more

White Noise A Dark Romance

first_imgDelhi welcomed another passionate author, Shruti Upadhaya, who released her first book titled ‘White Noise’, recently. The 143 page psychological thriller contains an element of dark romance which turns darker and mysterious subsequently. In a conversation with the Delhi based author, Devpriya Roy, who garnered applauses for her novel ‘The heat and Dust’, Shruti unraveled some interesting facts about the characters, her experience while writing the novel and much more. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe story majorly revolves around the female protagonist, a dreamer, readily giving into the man and leaving herself at his peril even as it destroys her mental sanity little by little. The first part of the book is narrated from the point of view of the girl. Throwing light on the process of writing her first novel, Upadhaya says, “When I start writing something, I need to know how I am going to end it. Same was the case with ‘White Noise’. The day I wrote my first paragraph for the book, was the day I actually wrote the last paragraph in my mind,” explained Shruti, who always had a flair for writing. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAnother unique aspect about the book is that neither the names of characters nor the physical setting is mentioned in the book as the author believes that these events could happen to anyone, anywhere. Commenting on the same, Shruti, a journalist turned author, says, “When I was eight chapters into the book, I realized that I haven’t used any names. It’s strange because I have never done that before. Every time I write a story, just like the climax, I consciously decide the names of the characters. But, with ‘White Noise’, perhaps I didn’t feel the need of assigning names to the characters.” Towards the second part, the voice of an omniscient narrator gives us a neutral insight into the plot. Post which, the plot takes a sudden turn with a secret being revealed- one that lies at the very heart of this liaison.Talking about her experience, author who felt deeply connected with the characters says, “The experience of ‘White Noise’ was nothing like anything I’d written before. I often say, I didn’t write the ‘White Noise’, it happened to me. Once I started to write, it began to flow in the most organic way. After a while, I stopped controlling the characters, and soon saw them coming to life. There was a time when I actually took a back seat to see my characters taking the story ahead.” The book is a rollercoaster for the readers as the chapters take swerves from one revelation to another.last_img read more

An effort to promote ecofriendly Durga puja

first_imgBengal Association, New Delhi, has pioneered the concept of recognising the Puja Committees which think about the future of Mother Earth and promote eco-friendliness in their respective Pujas. The Association is recognised as the premier institute of Bengalis, residing in the metropolis of Delhi and NCR, and are involved in various socio-cultural activities.For the last four years, Bengal Association started recognising eco-friendly Puja Committees by felicitating them with Poribesh Bandhob’ Sharodotsav Samman in Delhi and NCR. More than the opulence, the award concentrates on maintenance of cleanliness, hygiene, safety and security, first-aid /medical facilities, and clean and usable toilets, in the Puja Mandaps. The aim of the initiative is to encourage and disseminate awareness amongst all Durga Puja Committees so as to adopt eco-friendly measures. Also, recognising and supporting Prime Minister’s Initiative of ‘Swachh Bharat’, emphasis is being given on cleanliness of pandal and surrounding areas. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe project, a brain-child of Tapan Sengupta, General Secretary, has inspired many Puja Committees to adopt eco-friendly measures. Getting successful in their attempt, many Durga Puja Committees have started taking strides in ensuring that their celebrations do not harm the environment. They have started using biodegradable elements and are exploring and adopting green methods for building Durga Puja pandals.This year, Bengal Association, New Delhi, is organising its 5th Shaktibhute Sanatani – eco-friendly Poribesh Bandhob Sharodotsav Samman 2017 for the Durga Puja, organised in Delhi and NCR. The Competition for the first time is being judged by reputed exponents in the field of arts, crafts, literature, theatre, environment, social work etc. This year, about fifty Puja Committees are participating in the competition and the prize money has been increased manifold. The prizes include trophy along with a cash prize. The judging will be based on clean and eco-friendly efforts made and not on the basis of decorative lavish Puja pandals. From the response received till now, hopefully next year more Puja Committees will join and adopt eco-friendly measures.last_img read more

Fashion of the future

first_imgA recently organized fashion show, ‘Fashion Blazon 2017, held at the Footwear design and development institute (FDDI), evidently proved that future of Indian fashion and styling industry is in safe hands. Amalgamating creativity with contemporary ideas, numerous students of the institute presented self-designed attires, jewellery and footwear. Each and every presentation spoke of the efforts and the innovation put in by the students, who explored the new limits of the fashion world. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfOrganised within the college premises on November 17, the show was attended by renowned designers, fashion industry experts, and officials. Amidst claps and applause, the show opened with the first sequence ‘Marigold, which was entirely inspired by the Maharashtrian culture. The collection beautifully depicted ‘modernity in tradition’. Next in line was a collection around the theme of ‘Yoga’ followed by ‘Valentine special collection’. The glamorous garments, perfect for a romantic evening, totally stole the show. Other presentations based on themes like, ‘Tie and dye’– presenting ancient art majorly used in Rajasthan and Gujarat; ‘Game of Thrones’ – showcasing the inspiring characters from the famous TV show thereby capturing the Westeros feel; ‘Van Gogh’, ‘Silver’, and ‘Madhubani’ themes, were equally innovative. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveGiving a beautiful closure to the fashion show, a collection inspired by the queen of Chittor, Rani Padmavati, was also showcased. The story of valour and sacrifice was depicted via this sequence featuring royal attires of Rajput and Khalji dynasties.Mr Ravinder, Joint Secretary of DIPP graced the occasion as the chief guest. Harpreet Narula, head designer for the upcoming periodic drama Padmavati, was also present at the show. Impressed by the entire showcase, he went on to praise the hard work and efforts put in by the students. FDDI is an apex organisation which has been playing a pivotal role in facilitating the Indian industry by bridging the skill gap in the areas of footwear, leather, retail and management areas. FDDI has been functioning as an interface between the untapped talent and industry and its global counterparts by fulfilling the demand of skilled manpower with its state of art machines and world-class infrastructure.Overwhelmed with amazement, Arun Kumar Sinha, Managing Director, FDDI, congratulated the students for presenting such stupendous collections. “It was a great show considering the efforts of the students. I can see that many of them are quite professional. I loved the way they presented their ideas. When I came here, I had a notion that everything within this campus revolves around footwear designing. But looking at the versatility and the talent, I feel happy.”Speaking further about his plans to take FDDI to new heights, Sinha said, “There are two things which we are aiming at. Firstly, we are trying to bring more designers to the institute so that our students can learn from the professionals. Secondly, we want to provide better exposure by stepping out of the institute. This would help them get firsthand experience in designing, styling, and management. In the words of Aakriti Choudhry – a student who designed two of the garments for the show (one of which was inspired by the petals of the rose) – FDDI is the best platform for anyone who is enthusiastic about fashion or anything related to this industry. “This college is the perfect place to learn new things. It gave us innumerable opportunities to go places and learn, not just through words and teachings within the four walls of the classroom but through experiences. They also provide us with opportunities to go and attend events like the Amazon fashion week and other fashion events of the sort. Not every person wants to get into core designing like I want to be. The college faculty and the staff help us figure out what are we meant to do. I am really happy to be a part of this college and the event as well. Every designer has put in a lot of effort to make it a success.”last_img read more

The 7 Days Challenge Not Eat Pray Love but Eat Move Live

first_imgWant to eat healthier? Or move around town in a more sustainable manner? Or just lead your daily life in a smarter way? You need to try the ‘7 Days Challenge’. The Swedish Embassy in association with an educational institute has organised the Challenge targeting youth from classes 9 to 12 in schools and graduate and post-graduate students in colleges across the national capital.The Challenge is basically a call to action for the participants to practise sustainable lifestyles and consists of seven days of practical sustainable solutions focusing on three categories: Eat, move and live. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The 7 Days Challenge is an attempt really for a short period of time trying to encourage people to think, eat, live, move smartly and sustainably and doing so in a short period of time and in encouraging best practices and also creativity around sub-solutions,” Swedish Ambassador Klas Molin said while explaining the concept.”Coming up with new ideas, not just emulating, copying which is being done, but thinking creatively,” he said, adding that in the first round, young people who are using modern technologies and thinking in new ways and whose future will be more impacted by today’s choices, have been targeted. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIndia is the third country, after Kenya and Indonesia, where the 7 Days Challenge is being organised.But why seven days? “Calling it the 7 Days Challenge, I think, partly is psychological, that it is a manageable period of time,” Molin said.”Surely we can all devote a week to living smarter, thinking more consciously and acting, travelling and shopping more sustainably. It is a reasonable, manageable amount of time.”According to the website of the Challenge, its objectives are: To emphasise the role of individual action for sustainable development; to spread awareness about the need for adopting practical sustainable solutions and lifestyles at the individual level; to build individual capacity and motivate individuals to improvise and innovate their choices and lifestyle towards more sustainable ones. Explaining the concept of eat, move and live, Ambassador Molin referred to a kitchen garden within the Swedish Embassy compound in terms of “eat”. “Many people believe in growing their own vegetables right next door. It is not only nice to look at, it is very practical, it is healthy,” he said.In terms of “move”, he gave his own example and said that back home in Sweden he bicycled to school and then to work in professional life almost every day. “Since I was in middle school or junior high school, I biked to school and back. I biked to work.” Molin asserted that biking is “certainly the fastest and most convenient way” of getting about a modern city.Here in the Swedish Embassy, he said, staff members and colleagues are encouraged to car pool more, including with his own official car.In terms of “live”, Molin again gave the example of the Embassy and said the building was fitted with solar panels. He also said that a system has been developed within the Embassy complex – which only uses LED lights – to create composts by pooling in all organic waste.”We have pipes under the park, under the paved area and also in the back and all the rainwater or most of the rainwater is collected underground,” Molin said.The Ambassador also pointed out that Sweden has managed to have continuous GDP growth while at the same time cutting down on CO2 emissions.”So, growth is not contingent on old technologies and you know pumping out pollution. You can achieve growth in a smart way,” he asserted.last_img read more

Kuchipudi dancer set to dazzle Delhiites

first_imgNaureen Mehra, a dynamic and promising disciple of Dr(s) Raja, Radha and Kaushalya Reddy will be having her ‘Rangapravesham’ on November 21 at Kamani Auditorium.In the event tilted ‘Rangapravesham: A solo Kuchipudi dance recital’, she will enthrall the audience with her graceful and intricate dance moves during her first solo performance. The evening will start with an invocation of Lord Venkateshwara in the form of ‘Shree Venkateshwara Stothram’. This will be followed by ‘Dashavtara’ – a dance item which depicts the ten different avatars of Vishnu, the god of preservation. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe evening will preceed with ‘Tarana’, a Hindustani musical item, and a composition of the sitar maestro Bharat Ratna Pandit Ravi Shankar. Raja and Radha Reddy have choreographed this item in Kuchipudi classical dance style. The dancer is depicted as a sculpture that comes to life and dances merrily at the temple’s celebration and in the end, feeling sad again freezes back into sculpture. The dancer’s ‘abhinaya’ skills will come to the fore in her performance on the popular sufi song ‘Chaap Tilak’ – a poem composed by Amir Khusro, a 14th century Sufi mystic. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveComing towards the end, the dancer will give a vibrant performnce of ‘Tarangam’, one of the most popular items from the Kuchipudi repertoire. In this performance, she will showcase her rhythmic footwork patterns by dancing on the rim of a brass plate, depicting famous stories from Lord Krishna’s childhood. Naureen has been training under her world renowned gurus since the tender age of seven years. The contributions of the legendary Kuchipudi dancing couple Padmabhushan Dr Raja Radha Reddy and Dr Kaushalya Reddy to the rich and vibrant cultural landscape of Delhi are immense. They are credited with training hundreds of students under their watchful eyes, so that they carry forward the rich heritage of Kuchipudi and one such student is Naureen Mehra.last_img read more